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Prospects for utilisation of non-vacancy Internet data in labour market analysis—an overview

Author

Listed:
  • Karolien Lenaerts
  • Miroslav Beblavý
  • Brian Fabo

Abstract

Along with the advancement of the Internet in the last decade, researchers have increasingly identified the web as a research platform and a data source, pointing out its value for labour market analysis. This article presents a review of online data sources for this field. Specifically, the article introduces web-based research, focusing on the potential of relatively new data sources such as Google Trends, social networks (LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter) and Glassdoor (surveys). For these data sources, a review is done and recent empirical applications are listed. Web-based data can further our understanding of the dynamics of the labour market. JEL codes: E4, J2 Copyright Lenaerts et al. 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Karolien Lenaerts & Miroslav Beblavý & Brian Fabo, 2016. "Prospects for utilisation of non-vacancy Internet data in labour market analysis—an overview," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izalbr:v:5:y:2016:i:1:p:1-18:10.1186/s40172-016-0042-z
    DOI: 10.1186/s40172-016-0042-z
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    6. Nuarpear Lekfuangfu & Voraprapa Nakavachara & Paphatsorn Sawaengsuksant, 2017. "Glancing at Labour Market Mismatch with User-generated Internet Data," PIER Discussion Papers 53, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour market; Web-based research; Data sources; Google Trends; Social networking sites; Glassdoor;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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