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The condition of the Turking class: Are online employers fair and honest?

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  • Horton, John J.

Abstract

Critics of online labor markets claim that employer abuses are endemic in these markets. Surveying a sample of workers, I find that, on average, workers perceive online employers to be slightly fairer and more honest than offline employers.

Suggested Citation

  • Horton, John J., 2011. "The condition of the Turking class: Are online employers fair and honest?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 10-12, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:111:y:2011:i:1:p:10-12
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Clemens & Claudio Montenegro & Lant Pritchett, 2008. "The Place Premium: Wage Differences for Identical Workers across the U.S. Border," Working Papers 148, Center for Global Development.
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    Cited by:

    1. John Horton & David Rand & Richard Zeckhauser, 2011. "The online laboratory: conducting experiments in a real labor market," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 14(3), pages 399-425, September.
    2. Karolien Lenaerts & Miroslav Beblavý & Brian Fabo, 2016. "Prospects for utilisation of non-vacancy Internet data in labour market analysis—an overview," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    3. John J. Horton & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 2016. "The Causes of Peer Effects in Production: Evidence from a Series of Field Experiments," NBER Working Papers 22386, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Cristiano Codagnone & Fabienne Abadie & Federico Biagi, 2016. "The Future of Work in the ‘Sharing Economy’. Market Efficiency and Equitable Opportunities or Unfair Precarisation?," JRC Working Papers JRC101280, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

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