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The importance of foreign language skills in the labour markets of Central and Eastern Europe: assessment based on data from online job portals

Author

Listed:
  • Brian Fabo

    () (Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS)
    Central European University
    CentERdata)

  • Miroslav Beblavý

    (Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS))

  • Karolien Lenaerts

    (Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS))

Abstract

Abstract This paper investigates the role of foreign language skills in the Visegrad Four countries’ labour markets using data obtained from key online vacancy boards in these countries and from an online wage survey. Firstly, it considers the demand for language skills based on vacancies and then builds on this information by analysing the wage premium associated with foreign language skills on the occupation and individual level. The results indicate that English language knowledge is highly in demand in the Visegrad region, followed by the command of German language. Particularly, English proficiency appears to be correlated with higher wages, when controlled for common wage determinants in a regression.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian Fabo & Miroslav Beblavý & Karolien Lenaerts, 2017. "The importance of foreign language skills in the labour markets of Central and Eastern Europe: assessment based on data from online job portals," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 487-508, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:44:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10663-017-9374-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-017-9374-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage premium; Foreign language skills; Vacancy data; Web data;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

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