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The internet as a labor market matchmaker

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Kuhn

    (University of California, Santa Barbara, USA, and IZA, Germany)

Abstract

Since the internet’s earliest days, firms and workers have used various online methods to advertise and find jobs. Until recently there has been little evidence that any internet-based tool has had a measurable effect on job search or recruitment outcomes. However, recent studies, and the growing use of social networking as a business tool, suggest workers and firms are at last developing ways to use the internet as an effective matchmaking tool.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Kuhn, 2014. "The internet as a labor market matchmaker," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-18, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:n:18
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Holzer, Harry J, 1987. "Informal Job Search and Black Youth Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 446-452, June.
    2. Nikolaos Askitas & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2009. "Google Econometrics and Unemployment Forecasting," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 55(2), pages 107-120.
    3. repec:wyi:journl:002164 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Peter Kuhn & Kailing Shen, 2013. "Gender Discrimination in Job Ads: Evidence from China," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(1), pages 287-336.
    5. Jeffrey R. Brown & Austan Goolsbee, 2002. "Does the Internet Make Markets More Competitive? Evidence from the Life Insurance Industry," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(3), pages 481-507, June.
    6. Kroft, Kory & Pope, Devin G., 2012. "Does Online Search Crowd Out Traditional Search and Improve Matching Efficiency? Evidence from Craigslist," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2012-35, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 30 Nov 2012.
    7. Peter Kuhn & Hani Mansour, 2014. "Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(581), pages 1213-1233, December.
    8. Peter Kuhn & Mikal Skuterud, 2004. "Internet Job Search and Unemployment Durations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 218-232, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karolien Lenaerts & Miroslav Beblavý & Brian Fabo, 2016. "Prospects for utilisation of non-vacancy Internet data in labour market analysis—an overview," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    2. John Martin, 2015. "Activation and active labour market policies in OECD countries: stylised facts and evidence on their effectiveness," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, December.
    3. repec:kap:empiri:v:44:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10663-017-9374-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Demand for Digital Skills in the US Labour Market: The IT Skills Pyramid," CEPS Papers 12055, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    5. Simionescu, Mihaela & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2017. "Big Data and Unemployment Analysis," GLO Discussion Paper Series 81, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. Lucia Kureková & Miroslav Beblavý & Anna Thum-Thysen, 2015. "Using online vacancies and web surveys to analyse the labour market: a methodological inquiry," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-20, December.
    7. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data," CEPS Papers 11406, Centre for European Policy Studies.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job search; recruitment; internet; matching; job boards;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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