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Whither Activation Policies? Reflections for the Future

Author

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  • Martin, John P.

    () (University College Dublin)

Abstract

Activation policies aimed at getting working-age people off benefits and into work have been embraced by many OECD countries. In a previous paper, I have argued that activation strategies have performed well during the Great Recession and subsequent recovery in some, but not all, of these countries. At the same time it is pertinent to look to the future and to consider what challenges what challenges the activation paradigm is likely to face over the coming decades when US and European labour markets have to cope with ageing workforces and immigration, to name but two. In this paper, I set out my views on some of the major challenges facing activation strategies in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin, John P., 2016. "Whither Activation Policies? Reflections for the Future," IZA Policy Papers 114, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izapps:pp114
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Behncke, Stefanie & Frölich, Markus & Lechner, Michael, 2008. "A Caseworker Like Me: Does the Similarity between Unemployed and Caseworker Increase Job Placements?," IZA Discussion Papers 3437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. David T. Coe & Dennis J. Snower, 1997. "Policy Complementarities: The Case for Fundamental Labor Market Reform," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 1-35, March.
    3. Stefanie Behncke & Markus Frˆlich & Michael Lechner, 2010. "Unemployed and their caseworkers: should they be friends or foes?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(1), pages 67-92.
    4. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2009. "Unemployment, institutions, and reform complementarities: re-assessing the aggregate evidence for OECD countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 40-59, Spring.
    5. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2006. "Employment Patterns in OECD Countries: Reassessing the Role of Policies and Institutions," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 35, OECD Publishing.
    6. Nicola Duell & Shruti Singh & Peter Tergeist, 2009. "Activation Policies in Norway," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 78, OECD Publishing.
    7. Richard Hendra & James Riccio & Richard Dorsett & Philip Robins, 2015. "Breaking the low pay, no pay cycle: the effects of the UK Employment Retention and Advancement programme," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-32, December.
    8. repec:eee:labeco:v:51:y:2018:i:c:p:63-85 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. David Grubb & Shruti Singh & Peter Tergeist, 2009. "Activation Policies in Ireland," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 75, OECD Publishing.
    10. Avram, Silvia & Brewer, Mike & Salvatori, Andrea, 2018. "Can't work or won't work: Quasi-experimental evidence on work search requirements for single parents," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 63-85.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin, John P., 2017. "Policies to Expand Digital Skills for the Machine Age," IZA Policy Papers 123, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    activation; active labour market policies; unemployment benefits; benefit conditionality; career progression;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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