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Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data

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  • Beblavý, Miroslav
  • Fabo, Brian
  • Lenaerts, Karolien

Abstract

Using a sample of approximately 2 million job advertisements published online, this paper assesses which educational, skills and other requirements US employers demand the most. The analysis is focused on the 30 most-frequently advertised occupations in the United States, of different levels of complexity, and finds that employers are quite demanding in their job advertisements, even when these concern low- or medium-skilled occupations. Although vacancies for more complex occupations are generally more demanding than those for less complex ones, there is a lot of variation across the 30 occupations. Formal education is the most important criterion for employers in the United States; it is required in 67% of the vacancies examined. Specialised training and licenses, in contrast, appear to be less important. Of the cognitive and non-cognitive skills, service skills in particular are high in demand (called for in 49% of the vacancies). Other non-cognitive skills, both of a social and personal nature, are frequently included as well. Experience is the third key criterion that employers use to screen job applicants, appearing in 38% of the vacancies.

Suggested Citation

  • Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Skills Requirements for the 30 Most-Frequently Advertised Occupations in the United States: An analysis based on online vacancy data," CEPS Papers 11406, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:11406
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    File URL: https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/SR%20No%20132%20Skill%20Requirements.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: Do Employers Demand Greater Skill When Workers Are Plentiful?," Working Paper Series rwp15-013, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    2. Nikolaos Askitas & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2015. "The internet as a data source for advancement in social sciences," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(1), pages 2-12, April.
    3. repec:wyi:journl:002164 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Peter Kuhn & Kailing Shen, 2013. "Gender Discrimination in Job Ads: Evidence from China," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(1), pages 287-336.
    5. Nan L. Maxwell, 2006. "The Working Life: The Labor Market for Workers in Low-Skilled Jobs," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number twl, November.
    6. Brunello, Giorgio & Schlotter, Martin, 2011. "Non Cognitive Skills and Personality Traits: Labour Market Relevance and their Development in Education & Training Systems," IZA Discussion Papers 5743, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Peter Kuhn & Hani Mansour, 2014. "Is Internet Job Search Still Ineffective?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(581), pages 1213-1233, December.
    8. Kureková, Lucia Mýtna & Beblavy, Miroslav & Thum, Anna-Elisabeth, 2014. "Using Internet Data to Analyse the Labour Market: A Methodological Enquiry," IZA Discussion Papers 8555, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2015. "Upskilling: do employers demand greater skill when skilled workers are plentiful?," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    10. Peter Kuhn, 2014. "The internet as a labor market matchmaker," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-18, May.
    11. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:18 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Beblavý, Miroslav & Fabo, Brian & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2016. "Demand for Digital Skills in the US Labour Market: The IT Skills Pyramid," CEPS Papers 12055, Centre for European Policy Studies.

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