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Joseph R. Cummins

Personal Details

First Name:Joseph
Middle Name:R.
Last Name:Cummins
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pcu163
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2014 Economics Department; University of California-Davis (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-Riverside

Riverside, California (United States)
http://www.economics.ucr.edu/

(951) 827-3266
(951) 827-5685
4128 Sproul Hall, Riverside, CA 92521-0427
RePEc:edi:deucrus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Anaka Aiyar & Joseph Cummins, 2020. "An Age Profile Perspective on Two Puzzles in Global Child Health: the Indian Enigma and Economic Growth," Working Papers 202019, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  2. Joseph Cummins & Anaka Aiyar, 2017. "Age-Profile Estimates of the Relationship Between Economic Growth and Child Health," Working Papers 201710, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  3. Joseph Cummins & Neha Agarwal & Anaka Aiyar & Arpita Bhattacharjee & Christian Gunadi & Deepak Singhania & Matthew Taylor & Evan Wigton-Jones, 2017. "Month of Birth and Child Height in 40 Countries," Working Papers 201703, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  4. Joseph Cummins, 2016. "Heterogeneous Treatment Effects in the Low Track: Revisiting the Kenyan Primary School Experiment," Working Papers 201615, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  5. Joseph Cummins, 2013. "On the Use and Misuse of Child Height-for-Age Z-score in the Demographic and Health Surveys," Working Papers 201417, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  6. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joe & Smith, Brock, 2010. "The Surprising Wealth of Pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 25468, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Aiyar, Anaka & Cummins, Joseph R., 2021. "An age profile perspective on two puzzles in global child health: The Indian Enigma & economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C).
  2. Agarwal, Neha & Aiyar, Anaka & Bhattacharjee, Arpita & Cummins, Joseph & Gunadi, Christian & Singhania, Deepak & Taylor, Matthew & Wigton-Jones, Evan, 2017. "Month of birth and child height in 40 countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 10-13.
  3. Cummins, Joseph R., 2017. "Heterogeneous treatment effects in the low track: Revisiting the Kenyan primary school experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 40-51.
  4. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joseph & Smith, Brock, 2012. "Malthus, Wages, and Preindustrial Growth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(2), pages 364-392, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joe & Smith, Brock, 2010. "The Surprising Wealth of Pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 25468, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Pre-industrial revolution England did not grow, but was rich
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-11-03 19:56:00

Working papers

  1. Joseph Cummins & Anaka Aiyar, 2017. "Age-Profile Estimates of the Relationship Between Economic Growth and Child Health," Working Papers 201710, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Aiyar, Anaka & Cummins, Joseph R., 2021. "An age profile perspective on two puzzles in global child health: The Indian Enigma & economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C).
    2. Anaka Aiyar & Joseph Cummins, 2020. "An Age Profile Perspective on Two Puzzles in Global Child Health: the Indian Enigma and Economic Growth," Working Papers 202019, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

  2. Joseph Cummins & Neha Agarwal & Anaka Aiyar & Arpita Bhattacharjee & Christian Gunadi & Deepak Singhania & Matthew Taylor & Evan Wigton-Jones, 2017. "Month of Birth and Child Height in 40 Countries," Working Papers 201703, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Larsen, Anna F. & Headey, Derek & Masters, William A., 2017. "Misreporting Month of Birth: Implications for Research on Nutrition and Early Childhood in Low-Income Countries," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258554, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Anna Folke Larsen & Derek Headey & William A. Masters, 2019. "Misreporting Month of Birth: Diagnosis and Implications for Research on Nutrition and Early Childhood in Developing Countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(2), pages 707-728, April.
    3. Caitlin S. Brown & Martin Ravallion & Dominique van de Walle, 2017. "Are Poor Individuals Mainly Found in Poor Households? Evidence using Nutrition Data for Africa," NBER Working Papers 24047, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Finaret, Amelia B. & Masters, William A., 2020. "Can shorter mothers have taller children? Nutritional mobility, health equity and the intergenerational transmission of relative height," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 39(C).
    5. Gupta, Aashish, 2020. "Seasonal variation in infant mortality in India," SocArXiv x4rv7, Center for Open Science.

  3. Joseph Cummins, 2016. "Heterogeneous Treatment Effects in the Low Track: Revisiting the Kenyan Primary School Experiment," Working Papers 201615, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kimbrough, Erik O. & McGee, Andrew & Shigeoka, Hitoshi, 2017. "How Do Peers Impact Learning? An Experimental Investigation of Peer-To-Peer Teaching and Ability Tracking," IZA Discussion Papers 10783, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Brown, Annette N. & Wood, Benjamin Douglas Kuflick, 2018. "Which tests not witch hunts: A diagnostic approach for conducting replication research," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 12, pages 1-26.
    3. Delprato, Marcos & Akyeampong, Kwame, 2019. "The effect of working on students’ learning in Latin America: Evidence from the learning survey TERCE," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1-1.
    4. Roller, Marcus & Steinberg, Daniel, 2020. "The distributional effects of early school stratification - non-parametric evidence from Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 125(C).

  4. Joseph Cummins, 2013. "On the Use and Misuse of Child Height-for-Age Z-score in the Demographic and Health Surveys," Working Papers 201417, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Aiyar, Anaka & Cummins, Joseph R., 2021. "An age profile perspective on two puzzles in global child health: The Indian Enigma & economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C).
    2. Vyas, Sangita & Kov, Phyrum & Smets, Susanna & Spears, Dean, 2016. "Disease externalities and net nutrition: Evidence from changes in sanitation and child height in Cambodia, 2005–2010," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 235-245.
    3. Gollin, Douglas & Kirchberger, Martina & Lagakos, David, 2017. "In Search of a Spatial Equilibrium in the Developing World," CEPR Discussion Papers 12114, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Joseph Cummins & Anaka Aiyar, 2017. "Age-Profile Estimates of the Relationship Between Economic Growth and Child Health," Working Papers 201710, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    5. Spears, Dean & Coffey, Diane & Behrman, Jere R., 2019. "Birth Order, Fertility, and Child Height in India and Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 12289, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Mulmi, Prajula & Block, Steven A. & Shively, Gerald E. & Masters, William A., 2016. "Climatic conditions and child height: Sex-specific vulnerability and the protective effects of sanitation and food markets in Nepal," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 63-75.
    7. Darrouzet-Nardi, Amelia & Masters, William, 2015. "Nutrition smoothing: Can access to towns and cities protect children against poor health conditions at birth?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211558, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Cally Ardington & Megan Little, 2016. "The Impact of Maternal Death on Children's Health and Education Outcomes," SALDRU Working Papers 184, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    9. Joseph Cummins & Neha Agarwal & Anaka Aiyar & Arpita Bhattacharjee & Christian Gunadi & Deepak Singhania & Matthew Taylor & Evan Wigton-Jones, 2017. "Month of Birth and Child Height in 40 Countries," Working Papers 201703, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    10. Gupta, Aashish, 2020. "Seasonal variation in infant mortality in India," SocArXiv x4rv7, Center for Open Science.
    11. Könings, Fabian & Schwab, Jakob, 2018. "Accounting for Intergenerational Social Mobility in Low- and Middle-Income Countries - Evidence from the Poorest in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181634, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    12. Beuermann, Diether W. & Pecha, Camilo J., 2020. "The effects of weather shocks on early childhood development: Evidence from 25 years of tropical storms in Jamaica," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 37(C).
    13. Hirvonen, Kalle & Sohnesen, Thomas Pave & Bundervoet, Tom, 2018. "Impact of Ethiopia’s 2015 drought on child undernutrition," ESSP working papers 114, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Anaka Aiyar & Joseph Cummins, 2020. "An Age Profile Perspective on Two Puzzles in Global Child Health: the Indian Enigma and Economic Growth," Working Papers 202019, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    15. Matthias Rieger & Sofia Karina Trommlerová, 2016. "Age-Specific Correlates of Child Growth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 241-267, February.
    16. Beuermann, Diether & Pecha, Camilo & Schmid, Juan Pedro, 2018. "The Effects of Weather Shocks on Early Childhood Development," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8543, Inter-American Development Bank.
    17. Darrouzet-Nardi, Amelia & Masters, William A., 2014. "Market access and child nutrition in a conflict environment," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170286, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

  5. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joe & Smith, Brock, 2010. "The Surprising Wealth of Pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 25468, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Broadberry, Stephen & Campbell, Bruce M.S. & van Leeuwen, Bas, 2013. "When did Britain industrialise? The sectoral distribution of the labour force and labour productivity in Britain, 1381–1851," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 16-27.
    2. Clark, Gregory, 2013. "1381 and the Malthus delusion," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 4-15.

Articles

  1. Agarwal, Neha & Aiyar, Anaka & Bhattacharjee, Arpita & Cummins, Joseph & Gunadi, Christian & Singhania, Deepak & Taylor, Matthew & Wigton-Jones, Evan, 2017. "Month of birth and child height in 40 countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 10-13.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Cummins, Joseph R., 2017. "Heterogeneous treatment effects in the low track: Revisiting the Kenyan primary school experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 40-51.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Clark, Gregory & Cummins, Joseph & Smith, Brock, 2012. "Malthus, Wages, and Preindustrial Growth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(2), pages 364-392, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Groth, Christian & Persson, Karl Gunnar, 2016. "Growth or stagnation in pre-industrial Britain? A revealed income growth approach," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 264, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Thomas Baudin & Robert Stelter, 2019. "The rural exodus and the rise of Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2019-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Clark, Gregory, 2013. "1381 and the Malthus delusion," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 4-15.
    4. Karol Jan Borowiecki & Alexander Tepper, 2013. "Accounting for breakout in Britain: The Industrial Revolution through a Malthusian lens," Staff Reports 639, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    5. Maya Shatzmiller, 2015. "An early knowledge economy: the adoption of paper, human capital and economic change in the medieval Islamic Middle East, 700-1300 AD," Working Papers 0064, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    6. Thomas Baudin & Robert Stelter, 2016. "Rural exodus and fertility at the time of industrialization," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2016020, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    7. Wallis, Patrick & Colson, Justin & Chilosi, David, 2016. "Puncturing the Malthus delusion: structural change in the British economy before the industrial revolution, 1500-1800," Economic History Working Papers 66816, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (5) 2016-11-27 2017-03-19 2017-10-15 2018-08-13 2020-08-31. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (4) 2014-09-25 2017-03-19 2017-10-15 2018-08-13
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2017-10-15
  4. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2014-09-25
  5. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2016-11-27
  6. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2016-11-27
  7. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2010-10-09
  8. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2010-10-09
  9. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2016-11-27

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