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The Distributional Effects of Early School Stratification - Non-Parametric Evidence from Germany

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  • Roller, Marcus

    () (University of Basel)

  • Steinberg, Daniel

Abstract

The effects of early school stratification on scholastic performance have been subject to controversial debates in educational policy and science. We exploit a unique variation in Lower Saxony, Germany, where performance based tracking was preponed from grade 7 to grade 5 in 2004. We measure the long-run effects of early school stratification on individual PISA test scores along the entire skill distriubution using the changes-in-changes estimator. Our results indicate that preponed school tracking increased test scores at the upper tail and lowered test scores at the lower tail of the skill distribution, compensating each other on average.

Suggested Citation

  • Roller, Marcus & Steinberg, Daniel, 2017. "The Distributional Effects of Early School Stratification - Non-Parametric Evidence from Germany," Working papers 2017/20, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2017/20
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    Cited by:

    1. Dominique Sulzmaier, 2020. "The causal effect of early tracking in German schools on the intergenerational transmission of education," Working Papers 187, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Analysis of Education; Education and Inequality; Tracking; Government Policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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