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The role of learning for asset prices and business cycles

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  • Winkler, Fabian

Abstract

The implications of learning-based asset pricing are examined in a business cycle model with financial frictions. Agents learn about stock prices while firms face credit constraints that depend partly on their market value. Expectations are constrained to remain model-consistent conditional on a subjective belief for stock prices. The combination of financial frictions and learning amplifies shocks through a two-sided feedback mechanism between asset prices and real activity. The model matches not only important asset price and business cycle moments, but also several patterns of forecast error predictability in survey data across a range of variables.

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  • Winkler, Fabian, 2020. "The role of learning for asset prices and business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 42-58.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:114:y:2020:i:c:p:42-58
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2019.03.002
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    Cited by:

    1. Caines, Colin, 2020. "Can learning explain boom-bust cycles in asset prices? An application to the US housing boom," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C).
    2. Iliopulos, Eleni & Perego, Erica & Sopraseuth, Thepthida, 2021. "International business cycles: Information matters," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 19-34.
    3. Zhang, Tongbin, 2021. "Stock prices and the risk-free rate: An internal rationality approach," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).
    4. Adam, Klaus & Merkel, Sebastian, 2019. "Stock price cycles and business cycles," Working Paper Series 2316, European Central Bank.
    5. Caines, Colin & Winkler, Fabian, 2021. "Asset price beliefs and optimal monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 53-67.
    6. Andrew Y. Chen & Rebecca Wasyk & Fabian Winkler, 2017. "A Likelihood-Based Comparison of Macro Asset Pricing Models," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-024, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Colin C. Caines & Fabian Winkler, 2018. "Asset Price Learning and Optimal Monetary Policy," International Finance Discussion Papers 1236, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Katsuhiro Oshima, 2021. "Heterogeneous beliefs, monetary policy, and stock price volatility," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 79-125, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Learning; Expectations; Financial frictions; Asset pricing; Survey forecasts;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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