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The Financial Accelerator under Learning and the Role of Monetary Policy

In: Monetary Policy under Financial Turbulence


  • Rodrigo Caputo

    (Banco Central de Chile)

  • Juan Pablo Medina

    (Banco Central de Chile)

  • Claudio Soto

    (Banco Central de Chile)


Financial frictions have been shown to play an important role amplifying business cycles fluctuations. In this paper we show that the financial accelerator mechanism, analyzed by Bernanke, Gertler and Gilrchrist (1999), combined with adaptive learning can amplify business cycle fluctuations significantly as the balance sheet channel interacts with the presence of endogenous asset price “bubbles”. These large business cycle fluctuations are amplified in a non-linear way by the size of the shocks and by the degree of financial fragility in the economy determined by its leverage. Our preliminary results indicate that even in the presence of endogenous bubbles, responding aggressively to inflation reduces output and inflation volatility. If the central bank adjusts its policy instrument in response to asset price fluctuations, it may reduce output volatility and even inflation volatility in the short run. However, that monetary policy conduct leads to a surge in inflation several periods after the shocks. A policy that aggressively responds to changes in asset prices may marginally reduce output volatility with respect to a policy that reacts aggressively to inflation, but also at the cost of generating inflationary pressures.
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Suggested Citation

  • Rodrigo Caputo & Juan Pablo Medina & Claudio Soto, 2011. "The Financial Accelerator under Learning and the Role of Monetary Policy," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Luis Felipe Céspedes & Roberto Chang & Diego Saravia (ed.), Monetary Policy under Financial Turbulence, edition 1, volume 16, chapter 7, pages 185-218 Central Bank of Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchsb:v16c07pp185-218

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Slobodyan, Sergey & Wouters, Raf, 2012. "Learning in an estimated medium-scale DSGE model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 26-46.
    2. Marcet, Albert & Sargent, Thomas J., 1989. "Convergence of least squares learning mechanisms in self-referential linear stochastic models," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 337-368, August.
    3. Gilchrist, Simon & Leahy, John V., 2002. "Monetary policy and asset prices," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-97, January.
    4. Richard H. Clarida & Jordi Gali & Mark Gertler, 1998. "Monetary policy rules in practice," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
    5. Robert J. Tetlow & Peter von zur Muehlen, 2002. "Monetary Policy, Asset Prices, and Misspecification: the robust approach to bubbles with model uncertainty," Computing in Economics and Finance 2002 335, Society for Computational Economics.
    6. Alejandro Justiniano & Bruce Preston, 2010. "Monetary policy and uncertainty in an empirical small open-economy model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 93-128.
    7. Dupor, Bill, 2005. "Stabilizing non-fundamental asset price movements under discretion and limited information," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(4), pages 727-747, May.
    8. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Kitney, 2016. "Financial factors and monetary policy: Determinacy and learnability of equilibrium," CAMA Working Papers 2016-41, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Cole, Stephen, 2016. "The limits of central bank forward guidance under learning," MPRA Paper 70862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:syd:wpaper:2123/8187 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rychalovska, Yuliya, 2016. "The implications of financial frictions and imperfect knowledge in the estimated DSGE model of the U.S. economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 259-282.
    5. André, Marine Charlotte & Dai, Meixing, 2017. "Is central bank conservatism desirable under learning?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 281-296.

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