IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article

Financial frictions in macroeconomic fluctations

  • Vincenzo Quadrini
Registered author(s):

    The key ideas for adding financial market frictions in general equilibrium models are not new in macroeconomics. However, it is only with the recent crisis that the profession has fully recognized the importance of financial markets for business cycle fluctuations. In this article I review some of the most popular ideas proposed in the literature and I show how the modeling of financial frictions helps us understand several dynamic features of the macroeconomy.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.richmondfed.org/publications/research/economic_quarterly/2011/q3/pdf/quadrini.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.richmondfed.org/publications/research/economic_quarterly/2011/q3/quadrini.cfm
    Download Restriction: no

    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond in its journal Economic Quarterly.

    Volume (Year): (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3Q ()
    Pages: 209-254

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedreq:y:2011:i:3q:p:209-254:n:v.97no.3
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.richmondfed.org/

    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Web: http://www.richmondfed.org/publications/ Email:


    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Alberto Martin & Jaume Ventura, 2010. "Economic Growth with Bubbles," NBER Working Papers 15870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Zheng Liu & Pengfei Wang & Tao Zha, 2011. "Land-price dynamics and macroeconomic fluctuations," NBER Working Papers 17045, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Matteo Iacoviello, 2002. "House prices, borrowing constraints and monetary policy in the business cycle," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 542, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 06 Dec 2004.
    4. Emmanuel Farhi & Jean Tirole, 2012. "Bubbly Liquidity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 678-706.
    5. Suarez,J. & Sussman,O., 1995. "Endogenous Cycles in a Stiglitz-Weiss Economy," Papers 9518, Centro de Estudios Monetarios Y Financieros-.
    6. Jianjun Miao & PENGFEI WANG, 2010. "Credit Risk and Business Cycles," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2010-033, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    7. Chen, Kaiji & Song, Zheng, 2009. "Financial Frictions on Capital Allocation: A Transmission Mechanism of TFP Fluctuations," MPRA Paper 15211, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Cooley, Thomas F. & Quadrini, Vincenzo, 2004. "Optimal monetary policy in a Phillips-curve world," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 174-208, October.
    9. Neumeyer, Pablo Andrés & Perri, Fabrizio, 2004. "Business Cycles in Emerging Economies: The Role of Interest Rates," CEPR Discussion Papers 4482, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Jermann, Urban J. & Quadrini, Vincenzo, 2007. "Stock market boom and the productivity gains of the 1990s," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 413-432, March.
    11. Oliver Hart & John Moore, 1994. "A Theory of Debt Based on the Inalienability of Human Capital," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 841-879.
    12. Covas, Francisco & Den Haan, Wouter, 2007. "The Role of Debt and Equity Finance over the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 6145, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Coen-Pirani, Daniele, 2005. "Margin requirements and equilibrium asset prices," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 449-475, March.
    14. Enrique G. Mendoza, 2010. "Sudden Stops, Financial Crises, and Leverage," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 1941-66, December.
    15. Pengfei Wang & Yi Wen, 2010. "Hayashi meets Kiyotaki and Moore: a theory of capital adjustment costs," Working Papers 2010-037, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    16. Fuerst, Timothy S., 1992. "Liquidity, loanable funds, and real activity," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 3-24, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedreq:y:2011:i:3q:p:209-254:n:v.97no.3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (William Perkins)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.