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Endogenous Cycles in a Stiglitz-Weiss Economy

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  • Suarez, Javier
  • Sussman, Oren

Abstract

The literature on financial imperfections and business cycles has focused on propagation mechanisms. In this paper we model a pure reversion mechanism, such that the economy may converge to a two-period equilibrium cycle. This mechanism confirms that financial imperfections may have a dramatic amplification effect. Unlike some related models, contracts are complete. Indexation is not assumed away. The welfare properties of a possible stabilizing policy are analysed. The model itself is a dynamic extension of the well-known Stiglitz-Weiss model of lending under moral hazard. Although stylized, the model still captures some important features of credit cycles.
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Suggested Citation

  • Suarez, Javier & Sussman, Oren, 1997. "Endogenous Cycles in a Stiglitz-Weiss Economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 47-71, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:76:y:1997:i:1:p:47-71
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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