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A Likelihood-Based Comparison of Macro Asset Pricing Models

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  • Andrew Y. Chen
  • Rebecca Wasyk
  • Fabian Winkler

Abstract

We estimate asset pricing models with multiple risks: long-run growth, long-run volatility, habit, and a residual. The Bayesian estimation accounts for the entire likelihood of consumption, dividends, and the price-dividend ratio. We find that the residual represents at least 80% of the variance of the price-dividend ratio. Moreover, the residual tracks most recognizable features of stock market history such as the 1990's boom and bust. Long run risks and habit contribute primarily in crises. The dominance of the residual comes from the low correlation between asset prices and consumption growth moments. We discuss theories which are consistent with our results.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Y. Chen & Rebecca Wasyk & Fabian Winkler, 2017. "A Likelihood-Based Comparison of Macro Asset Pricing Models," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-024, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2017-24
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2017.024
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    File URL: https://www.federalreserve.gov/econres/feds/files/2017024pap.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Jerry Tsai & Jessica A. Wachter, 2015. "Disaster Risk and its Implications for Asset Pricing," NBER Working Papers 20926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bayesian Estimation; Equity Premium Puzzle; Excess Volatility; Habit; Long run risks; Particle Filter; Rare Disasters;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General

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