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X-CAPM: An Extrapolative Capital Asset Pricing Model

Author

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  • Nicholas Barberis
  • Robin Greenwood
  • Lawrence Jin
  • Andrei Shleifer

Abstract

Survey evidence suggests that many investors form beliefs about future stock market returns by extrapolating past returns: they expect the stock market to perform well (poorly) in the near future if it performed well (poorly) in the recent past. Such beliefs are hard to reconcile with existing models of the aggregate stock market. We study a consumption-based asset pricing model in which some investors form beliefs about future price changes in the stock market by extrapolating past price changes, while other investors hold fully rational beliefs. We find that the model captures many features of actual prices and returns, but is also consistent with the survey evidence on investor expectations. This suggests that the survey evidence does not need to be seen as an inconvenient obstacle to understanding the stock market; on the contrary, it is consistent with the facts about prices and returns, and may be the key to understanding them.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Barberis & Robin Greenwood & Lawrence Jin & Andrei Shleifer, 2013. "X-CAPM: An Extrapolative Capital Asset Pricing Model," NBER Working Papers 19189, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19189 Note: AP
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G02 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Finance: Underlying Principles
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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