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Nominal Rigidities, News-Driven Business Cycles, and Monetary Policy


  • Kobayashi Keiichiro

    () (Hitotsubashi University and the Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry)

  • Nutahara Kengo

    () (Senshu University)


A news-driven business cycle is a positive comovement in consumption, labor, investment, and output caused by positive news about the future. Standard real business cycle models do not generate it. In this paper, we find that a used market friction i.e., sticky prices can be a source of news-driven business cycles from news about future technology growth, technology level, and expansionary monetary policy shocks. The key mechanism is the countercyclical movements of markups through nominal rigidities.

Suggested Citation

  • Kobayashi Keiichiro & Nutahara Kengo, 2010. "Nominal Rigidities, News-Driven Business Cycles, and Monetary Policy," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-26, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:10:y:2010:i:1:n:24

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Nir Jaimovich & Sergio Rebelo, 2009. "Can News about the Future Drive the Business Cycle?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(4), pages 1097-1118, September.
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    5. Nir Jaimovich & Sergio Rebelo, 2008. "News and Business Cycles in Open Economies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1699-1711, December.
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    9. Den Haan, Wouter J. & Kaltenbrunner, Georg, 2009. "Anticipated growth and business cycles in matching models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 309-327, April.
    10. Kobayashi, Keiichiro & Nakajima, Tomoyuki & Inaba, Masaru, 2012. "Collateral Constraint And News-Driven Cycles," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(05), pages 752-776, November.
    11. Robert D. Dittmar & William T. Gavin & Finn E. Kydland, 2005. "Inflation Persistence And Flexible Prices," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(1), pages 245-261, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christoph Görtz & John D. Tsoukalas, 2013. "Sector Specific News Shocks in Aggregate and Sectoral Fluctuations," CESifo Working Paper Series 4269, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Stéphane Auray & Paul Gomme & Shen Guo, 2013. "Nominal Rigidities, Monetary Policy and Pigou Cycles," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0, pages 455-473, May.
    3. Görtz, Christoph & Tsoukalas, John, 2011. "News and financial intermediation in aggregate and sectoral fluctuations," MPRA Paper 40442, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2012.
    4. Nutahara, Kengo, 2010. "Note on nominal rigidities and news-driven business cycles," MPRA Paper 24112, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Christoph Gortz & John D. Tsoukalas, 2013. "Learning, Capital Embodied Technology and Aggregate Fluctuations," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(4), pages 708-723, October.
    6. Guo Shen, 2011. "News Shocks and the External Finance Premium," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-27, December.
    7. Stephane Auray & Paul Gomme & Shen Guo, 2012. "Nominal Rigidities, Monetary Policy and Pigou Cycles: On-line Appendix," Working Papers 12007, Concordia University, Department of Economics.
    8. Nutahara, Kengo, 2010. "Internal and external habits and news-driven business cycles," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 300-303, May.
    9. Ko, Jun-Hyung & Miyazawa, Kensuke & Vu, Tuan Khai, 2012. "News shocks and Japanese macroeconomic fluctuations," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 292-304.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy


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