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Inflation and Economic Growth in the SADC: Some Panel Time-Series Evidence

  • Manoel Bittencourt, Renee van Eyden and Monaheng Seleteng

In this paper we investigate the role of inflation rates in determining economic growth in fifteen sub-Saharan African countries, which are all members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), between 1980 and 2009. The results, based on panel time-series data and analysis, suggest that in‡ation has had a detrimental effect to growth in the region. All in all, we highlight not only the fact that inflation has o¤set the prospective Mundell-Tobin effect and consequently reduced, the much needed, economic activity in the region, but also the importance of an institutional framework conducive to a stable macroeconomic environment as a precondition for development and prosperity in the community.

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Paper provided by Economic Research Southern Africa in its series Working Papers with number 404.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:404
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  17. repec:pre:wpaper:201126 is not listed on IDEAS
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