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Effectiveness and Spillovers of Online Sex Education: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Colombian Public Schools

  • Alberto Chong
  • Marco Gonzalez-Navarro
  • Dean Karlan
  • Martin Valdivia

Sexual health problems cause negative externalities from contagious diseases and public expenditure burdens from teenage pregnancies. In a randomized evaluation, we find that an online sexual-health education course in Colombia leads to significant impacts on knowledge and attitudes and, for those already sexually active, fewer STIs. To go beyond self-reported measures, we provide condom vouchers six months after the course, and find a 9 percentage point increase in redemption. We find no evidence of spillovers to untreated classrooms, but we do observe a social reinforcement effect: the impact intensifies when a larger fraction of a student's friends is also treated.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18776.

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Date of creation: Feb 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18776
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  1. Dean Karlan & Martin Valdivia, 2006. "Teaching entrepreneurship: Impact of business training on microfinance clients and institutions," Natural Field Experiments 00282, The Field Experiments Website.
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