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An implicit price of a DALY for use in a cost-benefit analysis of ARVs

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  • Robert Brent

Abstract

This article uses the revealed preference approach to estimate the price for a Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) implied by grant decisions by the Global Fund for AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria (GFATM). A cost-benefit criterion is used that requires the DALY price exceed the cost-effectiveness ratio. The estimated price was $6300 for a DALY saved from any disease, but it was $11 900 from a DALY saved specifically from HIV/AIDS. Estimates of the cost-effectiveness ratios of Antiretroviral Drug Therapies (ARVs) in the literature were examined. At the DALY prices implicit by GFATM decisions, ARVs would be socially worthwhile.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Brent, 2011. "An implicit price of a DALY for use in a cost-benefit analysis of ARVs," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(11), pages 1413-1421.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:43:y:2011:i:11:p:1413-1421
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840802600475
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. Brent, 2003. "Cost–Benefit Analysis and Health Care Evaluations," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2555, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernando Lavadenz & Carla Pantanali & Eliana Zeballos, 2015. "Thirty Years of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Argentina," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22124, January.
    2. Stein, Alexander J., 2013. "Rethinking the measurement of undernutrition in a broader health context: Should we look at possible causes or actual effects:," IFPRI discussion papers 1298, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Brent, Robert J., 2016. "The value of reducing HIV stigma," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 233-240.
    4. Alberto Chong & Marco Gonzalez-Navarro & Dean Karlan & Martin Valdivia, 2013. "Do Information Technologies Improve Teenagers’ Sexual Education? Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Colombia," NBER Working Papers 18776, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Robert J. Brent, 2010. "Setting Priorities for HIV/AIDS Interventions," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12742, April.

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