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Tariff and FDI Liberalization: What to Expect from China´s Entry into the WTO?

  • Sebastián Claro

    ()

    (Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.)

This paper presents a model that introduces foreign firms' competition in product and factor markets in an otherwise standard tariff liberalization setting. Pressures on factor markets from more advanced foreign firms undermine the competitive position of native enterprises. The final impact on native firms' employment, the country's comparative advantage and factor returns depend on the size and dispersion of the technology differences, the ability of native firms to imitate more advanced technologies and the final tariff structure. The case of China's entry into the WTO reveals the relevance of this feature, as the elimination of the dual economic structure is mandated by the WTO along with a fall in tariffs. The results show that in the short run the required process of FDI liberalization can generate a substantial impact on the factorial distribution of income and may imply a shift toward a more labor intensive mix of production, depending on the degree of technological imitations. However, nothing can be said with respect to the long run pattern of production.

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Paper provided by Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. in its series Documentos de Trabajo with number 209.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Publication status: Published as "Why Does China Protect its Labour-Intensive Industries More?", The Economics of Transition, 14 (2): 289-319, 2006.
Handle: RePEc:ioe:doctra:209
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  1. Robert C. Feenstra & Wen Hai & Wing T. Woo & Shunli Yao, 1998. "The US-China Bilateral Trade Balance: Its Size and Determinants," NBER Working Papers 6598, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen & Helga Hessenius, 1991. "East Germany in from the Cold: The Economic Aftermath of Currency Union," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(1), pages 1-106.
  3. Loren Brandt & Xiaodong Zhu, 2000. "Redistribution in a Decentralized Economy: Growth and Inflation in China under Reform," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(2), pages 422-451, April.
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