IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pma1985.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Romuald Méango
(Romuald Meango)

Personal Details

First Name:Romuald
Middle Name:
Last Name:Méango
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1985
https://sites.google.com/site/romualdmeango/

Affiliation

Münchener Zentrum für Ökonomie und Demographischen Wandel
Max-Planck-Institut für Sozialrecht und Sozialpolitik
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

München, Germany
http://mea.mpisoc.mpg.de/

+49 89 38602-442
+49 89 38602-490
Amalienstraße 33, 80799 München
RePEc:edi:memande (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Marc Henry & Romuald Meango & Ismael Mourifie, 2020. "Revealing gender-specific costs of STEM in an extended Roy model of major choice," Papers 2005.09095, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2020.
  2. Ismael Mourifié & Marc Henry & Romuald Méango, 2018. "Sharp Bounds and Testability of a Roy Model of STEM Major Choices," Working Papers 2018-084, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  3. Drometer, Marcus & Méango, Romuald & Burmann, Martina, 2018. "The Political Economy of European Asylum Policies," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181553, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  4. Girsberger, Esther Mirjam & Meango, Romuald & Rapoport, Hillel, 2018. "Regional Migration and Wage Inequality in the West African Economic and Monetary Union," IZA Discussion Papers 12048, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  5. Marcus Drometer & Romuald Méango, 2017. "Electoral Cycles, Partisan Effects and U.S. Naturalization Policies," ifo Working Paper Series 239, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  6. Romuald Méango, 2016. "What Makes Brain Drain More Likely? Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," CESifo Working Paper Series 6209, CESifo.
  7. Girsberger, Esther Mirjam & Meango, Romuald, 2016. "Educated unemployment in urban West Africa: Why do educated workers not grade down?," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145553, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  8. Drometer, Marcus & Méango, Romuald, 2015. "Electoral cycles, partisan effects and U.S. immigration policies," VfS Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113052, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  9. Romuald Méango, 2014. "International Student Migration: A Partial Identification Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 4677, CESifo.
  10. Romuald Méango, 2014. "Financing Student Migration: Evidence for a Commitment Problem," ifo Working Paper Series 187, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  11. Romuald Meango & Ismael Mourifie, 2013. "A note on the identification in two equations probit model with dummy endogenous regressor," Working Papers tecipa-503, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  12. Marc Henry & Romuald Méango & Maurice Queyranne, 2012. "Combinatorial Bootstrap Inference IN in Prtially Identified Incomplete Structural Models," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-837, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

Articles

  1. Girsberger, Esther Mirjam & Méango, Romuald & Rapoport, Hillel, 2020. "Regional migration and wage inequality in the West African economic and monetary union," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 385-404.
  2. Marcus Drometer & Romuald Méango, 2020. "Electoral cycles, partisan effects and US naturalization policies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 183(1), pages 43-68, April.
  3. Ismaël Mourifié & Marc Henry & Romuald Méango, 2020. "Sharp Bounds and Testability of a Roy Model of STEM Major Choices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 128(8), pages 3220-3283.
  4. Romuald Méango, 2016. "The Nature of Self-Employment," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(01), pages 77-79, May.
  5. Marc Henry & Romuald Méango & Maurice Queyranne, 2015. "Combinatorial approach to inference in partially identified incomplete structural models," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 6(2), pages 499-529, July.
  6. Mourifié, Ismael & Méango, Romuald, 2014. "A note on the identification in two equations probit model with dummy endogenous regressor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(3), pages 360-363.

Books

  1. Panu Poutvaara & Marcus Drometer & Romuald Méango & Till Nikolka & Daniel Leithold & Katrin Oesingmann & Sabine Rumscheidt & Daniela Wech, 2017. "Beschäftigungseffekte der regulatorischen Schwellenwerte für französische und deutsche Unternehmen," ifo Forschungsberichte, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 83.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ismael Mourifié & Marc Henry & Romuald Méango, 2018. "Sharp Bounds and Testability of a Roy Model of STEM Major Choices," Working Papers 2018-084, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Vitor Possebom, 2019. "Sharp Bounds for the Marginal Treatment Effect with Sample Selection," Papers 1904.08522, arXiv.org.
    2. Casey B. Mulligan, 2018. "Quantifier Elimination for Deduction in Econometrics," NBER Working Papers 24601, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Ban, Kyunghoon & Kedagni, Desire, 2020. "Nonparametric Bounds on Treatment Effects with Imperfect Instruments," ISU General Staff Papers 202010120700001113, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Kamat, Vishal, 2019. "Identification with Latent Choice Sets," TSE Working Papers 19-1031, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    5. Vishal Kamat, 2017. "Identification of Program Access Effects with an Application to Head Start," Papers 1711.02048, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2020.
    6. Vishal Kamat, 2018. "On the Identifying Content of Instrument Monotonicity," Papers 1807.01661, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2019.
    7. Andrew Chesher & Adam Rosen, 2019. "Generalized Instrumental Variable Models, Methods, and Applications," CeMMAP working papers CWP41/19, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    8. Marc Henry & Ivan Sidorov, 2020. "Occupational segregation in a Roy model with composition preferences," Papers 2012.04485, arXiv.org.
    9. Hiroaki Kaido & Yi Zhang, 2019. "Robust Likelihood Ratio Tests for Incomplete Economic Models," Papers 1910.04610, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2019.
    10. Thomas M. Russell, 2020. "Policy Transforms and Learning Optimal Policies," Papers 2012.11046, arXiv.org.

  2. Drometer, Marcus & Méango, Romuald & Burmann, Martina, 2018. "The Political Economy of European Asylum Policies," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181553, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2019. "Dragnet-controls and government ideology," ifo Working Paper Series 288, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    2. Heinemann, Friedrich, 2021. "The political economy of euro area sovereign debt restructuring," ZEW Discussion Papers 21-004, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.

  3. Girsberger, Esther Mirjam & Meango, Romuald & Rapoport, Hillel, 2018. "Regional Migration and Wage Inequality in the West African Economic and Monetary Union," IZA Discussion Papers 12048, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Simone Bertoli & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport & Ilse Ruyssen, 2019. "Weather shocks and migration intentions in Western Africa: Insights from a multilevel analysis," Post-Print hal-02315013, HAL.

  4. Marcus Drometer & Romuald Méango, 2017. "Electoral Cycles, Partisan Effects and U.S. Naturalization Policies," ifo Working Paper Series 239, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.

  5. Drometer, Marcus & Méango, Romuald, 2015. "Electoral cycles, partisan effects and U.S. immigration policies," VfS Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113052, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2018. "Government ideology and economic policy-making in the United States—a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 174(1), pages 145-207, January.

  6. Romuald Méango, 2014. "Financing Student Migration: Evidence for a Commitment Problem," ifo Working Paper Series 187, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Björn Kauder, 2014. "Incorporation of Municipalities and Population Growth – A Propensity Score Matching Approach," ifo Working Paper Series 188, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

  7. Romuald Meango & Ismael Mourifie, 2013. "A note on the identification in two equations probit model with dummy endogenous regressor," Working Papers tecipa-503, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Zhou Xun, 2015. "Preference for Redistribution and Inequality Perception in China: Evidence from the CGSS 2006," Working Papers halshs-01143131, HAL.
    2. Lina Zhang & David T. Frazier & D. S. Poskitt & Xueyan Zhao, 2020. "Decomposing Identification Gains and Evaluating Instrument Identification Power for Partially Identified Average Treatment Effects," Papers 2009.02642, arXiv.org.
    3. Zhou Xun, 2015. "Preference for Redistribution and Inequality Perception in China: Evidence from the CGSS 2006," AMSE Working Papers 1518, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    4. Giampiero Marra & Rosalba Radice & David M. Zimmer, 2020. "Estimating the binary endogenous effect of insurance on doctor visits by copula‐based regression additive models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 69(4), pages 953-971, August.
    5. Massimo Filippini & Suchita Srinivasan, 2020. "Voluntary adoption of environmental standards and limited attention: Evidence from the food and beverage industry in Vietnam," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 20/338, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    6. Cohen, Jed & Azarova, Valeriya & Kollmann, Andrea & Reichl, Johannes, 2019. "Q-complementarity in household adoption of photovoltaics and electricity-intensive goods: The case of electric vehicles," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 567-577.
    7. Han, Sukjin & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2017. "Identification in a generalization of bivariate probit models with dummy endogenous regressors," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 199(1), pages 63-73.

  8. Marc Henry & Romuald Méango & Maurice Queyranne, 2012. "Combinatorial Bootstrap Inference IN in Prtially Identified Incomplete Structural Models," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-837, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

    Cited by:

    1. Laffers, Lukas, 2013. "Identification in Models with Discrete Variables," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 1/2013, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    2. Andrew Chesher & Adam Rosen, 2013. "Generalized instrumental variable models," CeMMAP working papers CWP43/13, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Magnac, Thierry, 2014. "Identification partielle: méthodes et conséquences pour les applications empiriques," IDEI Working Papers 814, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.

Articles

  1. Girsberger, Esther Mirjam & Méango, Romuald & Rapoport, Hillel, 2020. "Regional migration and wage inequality in the West African economic and monetary union," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 385-404.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Marcus Drometer & Romuald Méango, 2020. "Electoral cycles, partisan effects and US naturalization policies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 183(1), pages 43-68, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Ismaël Mourifié & Marc Henry & Romuald Méango, 2020. "Sharp Bounds and Testability of a Roy Model of STEM Major Choices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 128(8), pages 3220-3283.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Marc Henry & Romuald Méango & Maurice Queyranne, 2015. "Combinatorial approach to inference in partially identified incomplete structural models," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 6(2), pages 499-529, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Bontemps & Thierry Magnac, 2017. "Set identification, moment restrictions, and inference," Post-Print hal-01575813, HAL.
    2. Andrew Chesher & Adam Rosen, 2016. "Characterizations of identified sets delivered by structural econometric models," CeMMAP working papers CWP44/16, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Lukáš Lafférs, 2019. "Identification in Models with Discrete Variables," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 53(2), pages 657-696, February.

  5. Mourifié, Ismael & Méango, Romuald, 2014. "A note on the identification in two equations probit model with dummy endogenous regressor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(3), pages 360-363.
    See citations under working paper version above.

Books

    Sorry, no citations of books recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 14 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (6) 2016-02-17 2017-10-15 2017-10-22 2018-02-19 2018-11-05 2019-02-04. Author is listed
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (5) 2016-02-17 2017-10-15 2017-10-22 2018-02-19 2018-11-05. Author is listed
  3. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (4) 2012-02-01 2013-10-25 2017-10-01 2018-11-26. Author is listed
  4. NEP-INT: International Trade (3) 2019-02-04 2019-05-13 2020-06-29
  5. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2018-02-19 2018-11-05
  6. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2019-05-13
  7. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2017-10-22
  8. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2012-02-01
  9. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2019-02-04
  10. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2020-06-15
  11. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2019-02-04
  12. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2020-06-15
  13. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2020-06-15

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Romuald Méango
(Romuald Meango) should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.