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Carol Scotese

Personal Details

First Name:Carol
Middle Name:
Last Name:Scotese
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple231
https://sites.google.com/view/carolscotese

Affiliation

Department of Economics
School of Business
Virginia Commonwealth University

Richmond, Virginia (United States)
http://www.business.vcu.edu/economics.html

: 804/828-1717
(804)828-8884
Box 844000, Richmond, VA 23284-4000
RePEc:edi:edvcuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Carol A. Scotese, 2012. "Wage inequality, tasks and occupations," Working Papers 1201, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.
  2. Carol Scotese, 2003. "Evidence on the Demographic Transition," Working Papers 0302, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.
  3. Carol Scotese, 2002. "Fertility and Education Premiums," Working Papers 0201, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.
  4. Carol Scotese Lehr, 2001. "Banks and Output Fluctuations," Working Papers 0101, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.
  5. Carol Scotese Lehr, 1999. "Divorce and Savings," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 352, Society for Computational Economics.
  6. Scotese, C.A. & Wang, P., 1995. "Dynamic Effects of Financial Intermediation over the Business Cycle," Papers 04-95-11, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  7. Wang, P. & Yip, C.K. & Scotese, C.A., 1991. "Fertility Choice and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," Papers 6-91-3, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Scotese Carol A., 2010. "War Mobilization and the Great Compression," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-29, July.
  2. Carol Scotese Lehr, 2009. "Evidence on the Demographic Transition," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(4), pages 871-887, November.
  3. Carol Scotese Lehr, 2003. "Fertility and education premiums," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 555-578, August.
  4. Scotese, Carol Lehr & Wang, Ping, 2000. "Dynamic Effects of Financial Intermediation over the Business Cycle," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(1), pages 34-57, January.
  5. Carol Lehr & John Maxwell, 2000. "Comparative Advantage, Trade, and Transboundary Pollution," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 205-227, July.
  6. Carol Scotese Lehr, 1999. "Banking on fewer children: Financial intermediation, fertility and economic development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 567-590.
  7. Palivos, Theodore & Scotese, Carol A, 1996. "Fertility, Growth and the Financing of Public Education and Health," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(4), pages 415-428, November.
  8. Scotese, Carol & Wang, Ping, 1995. "Can Government Enforcement Permanently Alter Fertility? The Case of China," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(4), pages 552-570, October.
  9. Scotese, Carol A., 1994. "Forecast smoothing and the optimal under-utilization of information at the federal reserve," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 653-670.
  10. Wang, Ping & Yip, Chong K & Scotese, Carol A, 1994. "Fertility Choice and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 255-266, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Carol Scotese, 2003. "Evidence on the Demographic Transition," Working Papers 0302, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Oded Galor, 2010. "The Demographic Transition: Causes and Consequences," Working Papers 2010-12, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    2. Filoso, Valerio & Papagni, Erasmo, 2010. "Fertility Choice and Financial Development," MPRA Paper 25930, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gordon H. Hanson & Craig McIntosh, 2010. "Birth Rates and Border Crossings: Latin American Migration to the US, Canada, Spain, and the UK," NBER Working Papers 16471, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fang, Hai & Eggleston, Karen N. & Rizzo, John A. & Zeckhauser, Richard J., 2012. "Jobs and Kids: Female Employment and Fertility in China," Working Paper Series rwp12-054, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    5. Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Ken Tabata, 2013. "Rising Longevity, Human Capital and Fertility in Overlapping Generations Version of an R&D-based Growth Model," Discussion Paper Series 104, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised May 2013.
    6. Wyndow, Paula & Li, Jianghong & Mattes, Eugen, 2013. "Female Empowerment as a Core Driver of Democratic Development: A Dynamic Panel Model from 1980 to 2005," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 34-54.
    7. Carolyn Chisadza & Manoel Bittencourt, 2015. "Education and Fertility: Panel Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 201526, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    8. Hai Fang & Karen N. Eggleston & John A. Rizzo & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 2010. "Jobs and Kids: Female Employment and Fertility in Rural China," NBER Working Papers 15886, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. David Cuberes & Alberto Basso, 2012. "Human Capital, Culture and the Onset of the Demographic Transition," Working Papers 2012024, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    10. Alberto Basso & David Cuberes Vilalta, 2011. "Institutions, culture and the onset of the demographic transition," Working Papers. Serie AD 2011-13, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    11. Carol H. Shiue, 2017. "Human capital and fertility in Chinese clans before modern growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 351-396, December.
    12. Ron W. NIELSEN, 2016. "Demographic Transition Theory and Its Link to the Historical Economic Growth," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 32-49, March.
    13. Ron W. NIELSEN, 2016. "Scientifically Unacceptable Established Knowledge in Demography and in Economic Research," Journal of Economics Library, KSP Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 429-457, September.
    14. Fang, Hai & Eggleston, Karen N. & Rizzo, John A. & Zeckhauser, Richard, 2010. "Female Employment and Fertility in Rural China," Working Paper Series rwp10-011, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    15. Vogel, Edgar, 2011. "Human Capital and the Demographic Transition: Why Schooling Became Optimal," MEA discussion paper series 11247, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

  2. Scotese, C.A. & Wang, P., 1995. "Dynamic Effects of Financial Intermediation over the Business Cycle," Papers 04-95-11, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jiang, Neville & Wang, Ping & Wu, Haibin, 2010. "Ability-heterogeneity, entrepreneurship, and economic growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 522-541, March.
    2. Carol Scotese Lehr, 2001. "Banks and Output Fluctuations," Working Papers 0101, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.

  3. Wang, P. & Yip, C.K. & Scotese, C.A., 1991. "Fertility Choice and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," Papers 6-91-3, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Yao, Yao, 2016. "Fertility and HIV risk in Africa," Working Paper Series 5342, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. : Carlo A. Favero & : Arie E. Gozluklu & : Haoxi Yang, 2013. "Demographics and The Behavior of Interest Rates," Working Papers wpn13-10, Warwick Business School, Finance Group.
    3. Petrucci, Alberto, 2003. "Money, endogenous fertility and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 527-539, December.
    4. Pietro F. Peretto & Simone Valente, 2013. "Growth on a Finite Planet: Resources, Technology, and Population in the Long Run," Working Papers 13-9, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    5. Doran, Justin, 2012. "An analysis of the interdependence of demographic factors, labour effort and economic growth in Ireland," MPRA Paper 48266, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Hondroyiannis, George & Papapetrou, Evangelia, 2001. "Demographic changes, labor effort and economic growth: empirical evidence from Greece," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 169-188, February.
    7. Charles H. Mullin & Ping Wang, 2002. "The Timing of Childbearing among Heterogeneous Women in Dynamic General Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 9231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Ahmad, Khalil & Ali, Amjad & Chani, Muhammad Irfan, 2014. "Does sector specific foreign aid matter for fertility? An empirical analysis form Pakistan," MPRA Paper 82528, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2014.
    9. Palivos, Theodore, 1995. "Endogenous fertility, multiple growth paths, and economic convergence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(8), pages 1489-1510, November.
    10. Ralph Z. Wang, 2005. "Optimum Population Growth with CIES Preference in the Infinite- Horizon Ramsey Model," Labor and Demography 0507007, EconWPA.
    11. Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Yoshiyasu Ono, 2007. "Does Pro-population Policy Raise Per Capita Consumption?," ISER Discussion Paper 0697, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    12. George Hondroyiannis, 2010. "Fertility Determinants and Economic Uncertainty: An Assessment Using European Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-50, March.
    13. Hondroyiannis, George & Papapetrou, Evangelia, 2005. "Fertility and output in Europe: new evidence from panel cointegration analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 143-156, March.
    14. Junjian Yi & Junsen Zhang, 2010. "The Effect Of House Price On Fertility: Evidence From Hong Kong," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 635-650, July.
    15. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1996. "Empirical tests to discern the dynamic causal chain in macroeconomic activity: new evidence from Thailand and Malaysia based on a multivariate cointegration/vector error-correction modeling approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 531-560, October.
    16. George Hondroyiannis & Evangelia Papapetrou, 1999. "Fertility choice and economic growth: Empirical evidence from the U.S," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, pages 108-120.
    17. Dalton Conley & Gordon C. McCord & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2007. "Africa's Lagging Demographic Transition: Evidence from Exogenous Impacts of Malaria Ecology and Agricultural Technology," NBER Working Papers 12892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Masih, A. Mansur M. & Masih, Rumi, 2002. "Propagative causal price transmission among international stock markets: evidence from the pre- and postglobalization period," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 63-91.
    19. Piotr Dominiak, & Ewa Lechman & Piotr Anna Okonowicz, 2014. "Fertility rebound and economic growth. New evidence for 18 countries over the period 1970-2011," Working Papers 28/2014, Institute of Economic Research, revised Dec 2014.
    20. Dierk Herzery & Holger Strulik & Sebastian Vollmer, 2010. "The Long-run Determinants of Fertility: One Century of Demographic Change 1900-1999," PGDA Working Papers 6310, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    21. Masih, Rumi & Masih, Abul M. M., 1996. "Macroeconomic activity dynamics and Granger causality: New evidence from a small developing economy based on a vector error-correction modelling analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 407-426, July.
    22. Chang, Wen-ya & Chen, Ying-an & Chang, Juin-jen, 2013. "Growth and welfare effects of monetary policy with endogenous fertility," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 117-130.
    23. Piotr Dominiak & Ewa Lechman & Anna Okonowicz, 2014. "The Fertility Rebound And Economic Growth. New Evidence For 18 Countries Over The Period 1970-2011," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 23, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    24. Petrucci, Alberto, 2015. "Optimal income taxation in models with endogenous fertility," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 216-225.
    25. Wei-Bin, ZHANG, 2015. "Economic Oscillations With Endogenous Population, Human Capital And Wealth," Annals of Spiru Haret University, Economic Series, Universitatea Spiru Haret, vol. 6(2), pages 9-26.
    26. Abul M. M. Masih & Rumi Masih, 1997. "Bivariate and Multivariate Tests of Money-Price Causality: Robust Evidence from a Small Developing Country," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(6), pages 803-825.

Articles

  1. Carol Scotese Lehr, 2009. "Evidence on the Demographic Transition," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(4), pages 871-887, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Scotese, Carol Lehr & Wang, Ping, 2000. "Dynamic Effects of Financial Intermediation over the Business Cycle," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(1), pages 34-57, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Carol Lehr & John Maxwell, 2000. "Comparative Advantage, Trade, and Transboundary Pollution," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 205-227, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicolas Peridy, 2006. "Pollution effects of free trade areas: Simulations from a general equilibrium model," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 37-62.

  4. Carol Scotese Lehr, 1999. "Banking on fewer children: Financial intermediation, fertility and economic development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 567-590.

    Cited by:

    1. Filoso, Valerio & Papagni, Erasmo, 2010. "Fertility Choice and Financial Development," MPRA Paper 25930, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Horváth, Csilla & Wieringa, Jaap E., 2003. "Combining time series and cross sectional data for the analysis of dynamic marketing systems," Research Report 03F13, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).

  5. Palivos, Theodore & Scotese, Carol A, 1996. "Fertility, Growth and the Financing of Public Education and Health," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(4), pages 415-428, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Leonid Azarnert, 2010. "Free education, fertility and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 449-468, March.

  6. Scotese, Carol & Wang, Ping, 1995. "Can Government Enforcement Permanently Alter Fertility? The Case of China," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(4), pages 552-570, October.

    Cited by:

    1. M. Merli & Herbert Smith, 2002. "Has the Chinese family planning policy been successful in changing fertility preferences?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(3), pages 557-572, August.
    2. Yuhua Shi & Jie Zhang, 2009. "On high fertility rates in developing countries: birth limits, birth taxes, or education subsidies?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 603-640, July.
    3. Fang, Hai & Eggleston, Karen N. & Rizzo, John A. & Zeckhauser, Richard J., 2012. "Jobs and Kids: Female Employment and Fertility in China," Working Paper Series rwp12-054, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    4. Frederic Tournemaine, 2007. "Can population promote income per-capita growth? A balanced perspective," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(8), pages 1-7.
    5. Yun Liang & John Gibson, 2017. "Location or Hukou: What Most Limits Fertility of Urban Women in China?," Working Papers in Economics 17/06, University of Waikato.
    6. J. Wilson Mixon Jr. & Gary H. Roseman, 2003. "Male-Female Life Expectancy and Economic Freedom," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 19(Fall 2003), pages 1-20.
    7. Hai Fang & Karen N. Eggleston & John A. Rizzo & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 2010. "Jobs and Kids: Female Employment and Fertility in Rural China," NBER Working Papers 15886, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Fang, Hai & Eggleston, Karen N. & Rizzo, John A. & Zeckhauser, Richard, 2010. "Female Employment and Fertility in Rural China," Working Paper Series rwp10-011, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

  7. Scotese, Carol A., 1994. "Forecast smoothing and the optimal under-utilization of information at the federal reserve," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 653-670.

    Cited by:

    1. Tara M. Sinclair & Fred Joutz & Herman O. Stekler, 2008. "Are 'unbiased' forecasts really unbiased? Another look at the Fed forecasts," Working Papers 2008-010, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting.
    2. Papastamos, Dimitrios & Matysiak, George & Stevenson, Simon, 2015. "Assessing the accuracy and dispersion of real estate investment forecasts," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 141-152.
    3. Masahiro Ashiya, 2006. "Testing the rationality of forecast revisions made by the IMF and the OECD," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 25-36.
    4. William T. Gavin, 2003. "FOMC forecasts: is all the information in the central tendency?," Working Papers 2003-002, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    5. Fred Joutz & Michael P. Clements & Herman O. Stekler, 2007. "An evaluation of the forecasts of the federal reserve: a pooled approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 121-136.
    6. Cho, Dong W., 2002. "Do revisions improve forecasts?," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 107-115.
    7. Dimitrios Papastamos & George Matysiak & Simon Stevenson, 2014. "A Comparative Analysis of the Accuracy and Uncertainty in Real Estate and Macroeconomic Forecasts," Real Estate & Planning Working Papers rep-wp2014-06, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    8. Peter Tillmann, 2011. "Reputation and Forecast Revisions: Evidence from the FOMC," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201128, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

  8. Wang, Ping & Yip, Chong K & Scotese, Carol A, 1994. "Fertility Choice and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 255-266, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2012-02-27
  2. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2012-02-27

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