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Pollution effects of free trade areas: Simulations from a general equilibrium model

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  • Nicolas Peridy

Abstract

A two-factors, two-goods, three-countries general equilibrium model is developed to assess the effects of a Free Trade Area (FTA) on pollution emissions. It also makes it possible to compare the effects of a discriminating commercial policy with alternative-non discriminating-policies, such as full trade liberalization or non-discriminating protection. A theoretical model is first developed in order to take into account country-differences in factor endowment, environmental regulation, pollution abatement technology, marginal disutilities of pollution, as well as terms of trade effects. This model is subsequently calibrated and computed in accordance with empirical evidence. The main conclusion shows that the move from protection to FTA reduces world pollution emissions. A second result indicates that, in case of full trade liberalization, world pollution is further reduced.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolas Peridy, 2006. "Pollution effects of free trade areas: Simulations from a general equilibrium model," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 37-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:20:y:2006:i:1:p:37-62
    DOI: 10.1080/10168730500515431
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Saeed Solaymani & Mehdi Shokrinia, 2016. "Economic and environmental effects of trade liberalization in Malaysia," Journal of Social and Economic Development, Springer;Institute for Social and Economic Change, vol. 18(1), pages 101-120, October.
    2. Ameer, Ayesha & Munir, Kashif, 2016. "Effect of Economic Growth, Trade Openness, Urbanization, and Technology on Environment of Selected Asian Countries," MPRA Paper 74571, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Cunha, Barbara & Mani, Muthukumara, 2011. "DR-CAFTA and the environment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5826, The World Bank.

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