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The Missing Pollution Haven Effect

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  • Arik Levinson

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Abstract

This paper examines the effect of recent increases inhazardous waste disposal taxes on employment growth inindustries that generate hazardous waste. Mostexisting literature has found that interjurisdictionaldifferences in environmental stringency havenegligible measurable economic consequences. Commonexplanations for this lack of effect include claimsthat (1) measures of environmental stringency arepoorly quantified, (2) compliance costs are modest,(3) variation in compliance costs among jurisdictionsis small, and (4) cross-section data are insufficientto explore the consequences of increasingly stringentstandards. This paper addresses these four concernsby quantifying hazardous waste disposal taxes,demonstrating that they are large and varied acrossjurisdictions in the United States, and showing thatthey have had a significant effect on hazardous wasteshipping among states. The paper then uses a panel ofstate and county-level data to show that despite thesefindings, state hazardous waste disposal taxes do notimpose large employment losses on industries thatgenerate waste. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Suggested Citation

  • Arik Levinson, 2000. "The Missing Pollution Haven Effect," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 15(4), pages 343-364, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:15:y:2000:i:4:p:343-364 DOI: 10.1023/A:1008324605045
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sigman, Hilary, 1996. "The Effects of Hazardous Waste Taxes on Waste Generation and Disposal," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 199-217, March.
    2. Randy A. Becker & J. Vernon Henderson, 2001. "Costs of Air Quality Regulation," NBER Chapters,in: Behavioral and Distributional Effects of Environmental Policy, pages 159-186 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Holtz-Eakin, Douglas & Newey, Whitney & Rosen, Harvey S, 1989. "The Revenues-Expenditures Nexus: Evidence from Local Government Data," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(2), pages 415-429, May.
    4. Newman, Robert J. & Sullivan, Dennis H., 1988. "Econometric analysis of business tax impacts on industrial location: What do we know, and how do we know it?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 215-234, March.
    5. Timothy J. Bartik, 2003. "Local Economic Development Policies," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 03-91, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    6. Timothy J. Bartik, 2002. "The Effects of Environmental Regulation on Business Location in the United States," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers,in: Wayne B. Gray (ed.), Economic Costs and Consequences of Environmental Regulation, pages 129-151 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    7. Adam B. Jaffe et al., 1995. "Environmental Regulation and the Competitiveness of U.S. Manufacturing: What Does the Evidence Tell Us?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 132-163, March.
    8. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle.
    9. Cropper, Maureen L & Oates, Wallace E, 1992. "Environmental Economics: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 675-740, June.
    10. Levinson, Arik, 1999. "NIMBY taxes matter: the case of state hazardous waste disposal taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 31-51, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. José-Antonio Monteiro & Madina Kukenova, 2008. "Does Lax Environmental Regulation Attract FDI When Accounting For "Third-Country" Effects?," IRENE Working Papers 08-01, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Cave, Lisa A. & Blomquist, Glenn C., 2008. "Environmental policy in the European Union: Fostering the development of pollution havens?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 253-261, April.
    3. Paul Missios & Halis Murat Yildiz & Ida Ferrara, 2009. "Foreign Direct Investment and the Choice of Environmental Policy," Working Papers 004, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    4. Nicolas Peridy, 2006. "Pollution effects of free trade areas: Simulations from a general equilibrium model," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 37-62.
    5. Maya Federman & David I. Levine, 2005. "Industrialization and Infant Mortality," Development and Comp Systems 0504008, EconWPA.

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