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Industrialization and Infant Mortality

Author

Listed:
  • Maya Federman

    (Pitzer College)

  • David I. Levine

    (Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley)

Abstract

On average, infant mortality rates are lower in more industrialized nations, yet health and mortality worsened during early industrialization in some nations. This study examines the effects of growing manufacturing employment on infant mortality across 274 Indonesian districts from 1985 to 1995, a time of rapid industrialization. Compared with cross-national studies we have a larger sample size of regions, more consistent data definitions, and better checks for causality and specification. We can also explore the causal mechanisms underlying our correlations. Overall the results suggest manufacturing employment raised living standards, housing quality, and reduced cooking with wood and coal, which helped reduce infant mortality. At the same time, pollution from factories appears quite harmful to infants. The overall effect was slightly higher infant mortality in regions that experienced greater industrialization.

Suggested Citation

  • Maya Federman & David I. Levine, 2005. "Industrialization and Infant Mortality," Development and Comp Systems 0504008, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0504008
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 40
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/dev/papers/0504/0504008.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert E. Lipsey & Fredrik Sjoholm, 2001. "Foreign Direct Investment and Wages in Indonesian Manufacturing," NBER Working Papers 8299, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Miguel, Edward A. & Gertler, Paul & Levine, David I., 2003. "Did Industrialization Destroy Social Capital in Indonesia?," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt9kt2m860, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    3. Eskeland, Gunnar S. & Harrison, Ann E., 2003. "Moving to greener pastures? Multinationals and the pollution haven hypothesis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 1-23, February.
    4. Tubagus Feridhanusetyawan & Haryo Aswicahyono & Ari A. Perdana, 2001. "The Male-Female Wage Differentials in Indonesia," CSIS Economics Working Paper Series WPE059, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Jakarta, Indonesia.
    5. Easterly, William, 1999. "Life during growth : international evidence on quality of life and per capita income," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2110, The World Bank.
    6. Pitt, Mark M & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Gibbons, Donna M, 1993. "The Determinants and Consequences of the Placement of Government Programs in Indonesia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 7(3), pages 319-348, September.
    7. Joseph Potter & Carl Schmertmann & Suzana Cavenaghi, 2002. "Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 739-761, November.
    8. Arik Levinson, 2000. "The Missing Pollution Haven Effect," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 15(4), pages 343-364, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Casabonne, Ursula & Kenny, Charles, 2012. "The Best Things in Life are (Nearly) Free: Technology, Knowledge, and Global Health," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 21-35.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrialization; infant mortality; Indonesia; pollution; indoor air pollution;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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