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Ten years after : what is special about transition countries?

  • Gros, Daniel
  • Suhrcke, Marc

Most countries commonly classified as ?in transition? are still recognisably different from other countries with a similar income per capita in some respects: a larger share of their work force is in industry, they use more energy, they have a more extensive infrastructure and invest more in schooling. However, in terms of the ?software? necessary for a market economy, two groups emerge: the countries that are candidates for EU membership seem to have partly completed the transition. By contrast, the countries from the former Soviet Union that form the CIS and the BALKAN countries, are still lagging behind especially in terms of the enforcement of property rights and the development of financial markets.

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Paper provided by Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA) in its series HWWA Discussion Papers with number 86.

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Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwadp:26236
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  1. Fischer, Stanley & Sahay, Ratna & Vegh, Carlos, 1998. "How far is Eastern Europe from Brussels?," MPRA Paper 20059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Queiroz, Cesar & Gautam, Surhid, 1992. "Road infrastructure and economic development : some diagnostic indicators," Policy Research Working Paper Series 921, The World Bank.
  3. Krkoska, Libor, 1999. "A Neoclassical Growth Model Applied to Transition in Central Europe," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 259-280, June.
  4. Era Dabla-Norris & Scott Freeman, 1999. "The Enforcement of Property Rights and Underdevelopment," IMF Working Papers 99/127, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Gray, D., 1995. "Reforming the Energy Sector in Transition Economies. Selected Experience and Lessons," World Bank - Discussion Papers 296, World Bank.
  6. Canning, David, 1999. "Infrastructure's contribution to aggregate output," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2246, The World Bank.
  7. Lant Pritchett & Lawrence H. Summers, 1996. "Wealthier is Healthier," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 841-868.
  8. Levine, Ross, 1996. "Financial development and economic growth : views and agenda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1678, The World Bank.
  9. Easterly, William, 1999. "Life during growth : international evidence on quality of life and per capita income," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2110, The World Bank.
  10. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1995. "Institutions And Economic Performance: Cross-Country Tests Using Alternative Institutional Measures," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(3), pages 207-227, November.
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