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Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil

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  • Joseph Potter

    ()

  • Carl Schmertmann
  • Suzana Cavenaghi

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  • Joseph Potter & Carl Schmertmann & Suzana Cavenaghi, 2002. "Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 739-761, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:39:y:2002:i:4:p:739-761
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2002.0039
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul Gertler & John Molyneaux, 1994. "How economic development and family planning programs combined to reduce indonesian fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(1), pages 33-63, February.
    2. Jean Drèze & Mamta Murthi, 2001. "Fertility, Education, and Development: Evidence from India," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(1), pages 33-63, March.
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