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Healthcare infrastructure, contraceptive use and infant mortality in Uttar Pradesh, India

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  • Bhargava, Alok
  • Chowdhury, Sadia
  • Singh, K.K.

Abstract

AbstractThis paper analyzes data on approximately 30,000 women from a survey in Uttar Pradesh in 1995 together with the data from surveys of public and private providers of healthcare and family planning services. A framework was developed for analyzing the effects of quality of services on utilization, and for understanding the gradual evolution of the healthcare infrastructure. The empirical results from logistic regressions for use of female sterilization and IUD showed significant effects of quality of services in government and private hospitals, and of socioeconomic variables such as education, caste, and an index of household possessions. Secondly, models for infant mortality of children born in the preceding 3-year period showed significant effects of socioeconomic variables, quality of healthcare services and birth spacing. Lastly, analysis of data at a more aggregated (Primary Sampling Unit) level indicated differential effects of economic development on the quality of services available in the public and private facilities.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bhargava, Alok & Chowdhury, Sadia & Singh, K.K., 2005. "Healthcare infrastructure, contraceptive use and infant mortality in Uttar Pradesh, India," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 388-404, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:3:y:2005:i:3:p:388-404
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bhargava, Alok, 2003. "Family planning, gender differences and infant mortality: evidence from Uttar Pradesh, India," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 225-240, January.
    2. Smith, Richard J & Blundell, Richard W, 1986. "An Exogeneity Test for a Simultaneous Equation Tobit Model with an Application to Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(3), pages 679-685, May.
    3. Jean Dr├Ęze & Mamta Murthi, 2001. "Fertility, Education, and Development: Evidence from India," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(1), pages 33-63.
    4. David H. Peters & Abdo S. Yazbeck & Rashmi R. Sharma & G. N. V. Ramana & Lant H. Pritchett & Adam Wagstaff, 2002. "Better Health Systems for India's Poor : Findings, Analysis, and Options," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14080, April.
    5. Wiji Arulampalam & Sonia Bhalotra, 2003. "Sibling Death Clustering in India: Genuine Scarring vs Unobserved Heterogeneity," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 03/552, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    6. Easterlin, Richard A. & Crimmins, Eileen M., 1985. "The Fertility Revolution," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226180298, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pablo Villalobos Dintrans & Claire Chaumont, 2017. "Examining the relationship between human resources and mortality: the effects of methodological choices," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 62(3), pages 361-370, April.
    2. Luke, Nancy & Munshi, Kaivan, 2007. "Social affiliation and the demand for health services: Caste and child health in South India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 256-279, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C40 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - General
    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • Z18 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Public Policy

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