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Birth Spacing and Neonatal Mortality in India : Dynamics, Frailty and Fecundity

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  • Bhalotra, S.
  • van Soest, A.H.O.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

Abstract

A dynamic panel data model of neonatal mortality and birth spacing is analyzed, accounting for causal effects of birth spacing on subsequent mortality and of mortality on the next birth interval, while controlling for unobserved heterogeneity in mortality (frailty) and birth spacing (fecundity). The model is estimated using micro data on about 30000 children of 7000 Indian mothers, for whom a complete retrospective record of fertility and child mortality is available. Information on sterilization is used to identify an equation for completion of family formation that is needed to account for right-censoring in the data. We find clear evidence of frailty, fecundity, and causal effects of birth spacing on mortality and vice versa, but find that birth interval effects can explain only a limited share of the correlation between neonatal mortality of successive children in a family.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bhalotra, S. & van Soest, A.H.O., 2005. "Birth Spacing and Neonatal Mortality in India : Dynamics, Frailty and Fecundity," Discussion Paper 2005-6, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:f01403a2-de39-4363-b033-675793926803
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; birth spacing; childhood mortality; health; dynamic panel data models; siblings;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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