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Can population promote income per-capita growth? A balanced perspective

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  • Frederic Tournemaine

    () (University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce)

Abstract

We develop a model in which technical progress, human capital and population interact endogenously to examine the impact of population growth on economic development. We find that population growth can be positively or negatively correlated with the growth rate of income per-capita. The outcome depends on the relative contribution of population and human capital to the determination of output growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Frederic Tournemaine, 2007. "Can population promote income per-capita growth? A balanced perspective," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(8), pages 1-7.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07o40001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Furuoka, Fumitaka, 2014. "Population and economic development in Sarawak, Malaysia," MPRA Paper 60636, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Fumitaka Furuoka & Qaiser Munir, 2011. "Population growth and standard of living: A threshold regression approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 844-859.
    3. Boucekkine, R. & Martínez, B. & Ruiz-Tamarit, J.R., 2013. "Growth vs. level effect of population change on economic development: An inspection into human-capital-related mechanisms," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 312-334.
    4. Frederic Tournemaine & Pongsak Luangaram, 2012. "R&D, human capital, fertility, and growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 923-953, July.
    5. Furuoka, Fumitaka, 2012. "Population Growth and Economic Development: Empirical Evidence from the Philippines," Philippine Journal of Development PJD 2010 Vol. 37 No. 1d, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    6. Bucci, Alberto, 2013. "Returns to specialization, competition, population, and growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 2023-2040.
    7. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2017. "Testing linear growth rate formulas of non-scale endogenous growth models," MERIT Working Papers 036, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    8. Fumitaka Furuoka, 2009. "Population Growth and Economic Development: New Empirical Evidence from Thailand," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(1), pages 1-14.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education;

    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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