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Marion Collewet

Personal Details

First Name:Marion
Middle Name:
Last Name:Collewet
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco824
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2017 Researchcentrum voor Onderwijs en Arbeidsmarkt (ROA); Maastricht University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(47%) Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE)
School of Business and Economics
Maastricht University

Maastricht, Netherlands
http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/SBE
RePEc:edi:meteonl (more details at EDIRC)

(47%) Researchcentrum voor Onderwijs en Arbeidsmarkt (ROA)
Maastricht University

Maastricht, Netherlands
https://roa.nl/
RePEc:edi:romaanl (more details at EDIRC)

(6%) Vakgroep Algemene Economie
School of Business and Economics
Maastricht University

Maastricht, Netherlands
http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/web/Faculties/SBE/Theme/Departments/Economics.htm
RePEc:edi:vamaanl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Collewet, Marion & Sauermann, Jan, 2017. "Working hours and productivity," Research Memorandum 009, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
  2. Collewet, M.M.F. & de Grip, A. & Koning, J.d., 2015. "Peer working time, labour supply, and happiness for male workers," ROA Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  3. Collewet, Marion & de Grip, Andries & de Koning, Jaap, 2015. "Conspicuous Work: Peer Working Time, Labour Supply and Happiness for Male Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 9011, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. Collewet, Marion, 2014. "Approaches to well-being, use of psychology and paternalism in economics," Economics Discussion Papers 2014-1, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).

Articles

  1. Collewet, Marion, 2014. "Approaches to well-being, use of psychology and paternalism in economics," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 8, pages 1-25.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Collewet, Marion & Sauermann, Jan, 2017. "Working hours and productivity," Research Memorandum 009, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Bank holidays & productivity
      by chris in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2017-04-23 17:07:12

Working papers

  1. Collewet, Marion & Sauermann, Jan, 2017. "Working hours and productivity," Research Memorandum 009, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).

    Cited by:

    1. Daniele Checchi & Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Lara Vivian & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa, 2022. "Hours Inequality," CESifo Working Paper Series 10128, CESifo.
    2. Bastian Kordyaka & Mario Lackner & Hendrik Sonnabend, 2019. "Can too many cooks spoil the broth? Coordination costs, fatigue, and performance in high-intensity tasks," Economics working papers 2019-19, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    3. Françoise Delmez & Vincent Vandenberghe, 2017. "Working long hours: less productive but less costly? Firm-level evidence from Belgium," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2017022, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    4. Nicola Breugst & Holger Patzelt & Dean A. Shepherd, 2020. "When is Effort Contagious in New Venture Management Teams? Understanding the Contingencies of Social Motivation Theory," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(8), pages 1556-1588, December.
    5. Adrian Chadi, 2017. "There Is No Place like Work: Evidence on Health and Labor Market Behavior from Changing Weather Conditions," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201709, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    6. Juliana Abagsonema Abane & Ronald Adamtey & Virceta Owusu Ayim, 2022. "Does organizational culture influence employee productivity at the local level? A test of Denison's culture model in Ghana’s local government sector," Future Business Journal, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 1-13, December.
    7. Rachet-Jacquet, Laurie, 2022. "Do breaks from surgery improve the performance of orthopaedic surgeons?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C).
    8. Dora Gicheva, 2020. "Occupational Social Value and Returns to Long Hours," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 87(347), pages 682-712, July.
    9. Cosaert, Sam & Lefebvre, Mathieu & Martin, Ludivine, 2022. "Are preferences for work reference dependent or time nonseparable? New experimental evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 148(C).
    10. Taehyun Ahn, 2022. "Workweek reduction and women's job turnover: Evidence from labor legislation in South Korea," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 60(4), pages 1607-1625, October.
    11. Eko Hariyadi Budiyanto & Raja Oloan Saut Gurning & Trika Pitana, 2021. "The Application of Business Impact Analysis Due to Electricity Disruption in a Container Terminal," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(21), pages 1-17, October.
    12. Rebecca Allen & Asma Benhenda & John Jerrim & Sam Sims, 2020. "New evidence on teachers' working hours in England. An empirical analysis of four datasets," CEPEO Working Paper Series 20-02, UCL Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, revised Jan 2020.
    13. Violeta Cvetkoska & Milanka Dimovska, 2021. "What Will Be The Productivity Of Employees With Shorter Work Hours?," International Journal of Business Research and Management (IJBRM), Computer Science Journals (CSC Journals), vol. 12(4), pages 139-162, August.
    14. Checchi, Daniele & Garca-Peñalosa, Cecilia & Vivian, Lara, 2022. "Hours Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 15759, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Elacqua, Gregory & Marotta, Luana, 2020. "Is working one job better than many? Assessing the impact of multiple school jobs on teacher performance in Rio de Janeiro," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    16. Hart, Robert A., 2019. "Labor Productivity during the Great Depression in UK Manufacturing," IZA Discussion Papers 12379, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2018. "Uncertainty over Working Schedules and Compensating Wage Differentials: From the viewpoint of labor management," Discussion papers 18015, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    18. Marta C.Lopes & Alessandro Tondini, 2022. "Firm-Level Effects of Reductions in Working Hours," FBK-IRVAPP Working Papers 2022-05, Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies (IRVAPP), Bruno Kessler Foundation.

  2. Collewet, M.M.F. & de Grip, A. & Koning, J.d., 2015. "Peer working time, labour supply, and happiness for male workers," ROA Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).

    Cited by:

    1. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
    2. Nie, Peng & Wang, Lu & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2020. "Peer Effects and Fertility Preferences in China: Evidence from the China Labor-Force Dynamics Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 13448, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Collewet, Marion & de Grip, Andries & de Koning, Jaap, 2015. "Conspicuous Work: Peer Working Time, Labour Supply and Happiness for Male Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 9011, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
    2. Martín Román, Ángel L. & Cuéllar-Martín, Jaime & Moral de Blas, Alfonso, 2018. "Labor supply and the business cycle: The “Bandwagon Worker Effect”," GLO Discussion Paper Series 274, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2016. "Work-sharing for a Sustainable Economy. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 111," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58684, January.
    4. Nie, Peng & Wang, Lu & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2020. "Peer Effects and Fertility Preferences in China: Evidence from the China Labor-Force Dynamics Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 13448, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  4. Collewet, Marion, 2014. "Approaches to well-being, use of psychology and paternalism in economics," Economics Discussion Papers 2014-1, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).

    Cited by:

    1. Nisticò, Sergio, 2015. "Enjoyment takes time: Some implications for choice theory," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 9, pages 1-40.
    2. Antonio Bariletti & Eleonora Sanfilippo, 2017. "At the origin of the notion of ?creative? goods in economics: Scitovsky and Hawtrey," HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT AND POLICY, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2017(1), pages 5-34.
    3. Antonio Bariletti & Eleonora Sanfilippo, 2015. "At the origin of the notion of “creative goods” in economics: Scitovsky and Hawtrey," Working Papers 2015-02, Universita' di Cassino, Dipartimento di Economia e Giurisprudenza.

Articles

  1. Collewet, Marion, 2014. "Approaches to well-being, use of psychology and paternalism in economics," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 8, pages 1-25.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (5) 2015-05-02 2015-05-16 2017-04-16 2017-05-21 2017-07-02. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (4) 2014-01-17 2015-05-02 2015-05-16 2015-05-22. Author is listed
  3. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (4) 2015-05-02 2015-05-22 2017-04-16 2017-05-21. Author is listed
  4. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (3) 2017-04-16 2017-05-21 2017-07-02. Author is listed
  5. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (3) 2015-05-02 2015-05-16 2015-05-22. Author is listed
  6. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (2) 2015-05-02 2015-05-16. Author is listed
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (2) 2015-05-16 2015-05-22. Author is listed
  8. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2014-01-17
  9. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2014-01-17
  10. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (1) 2014-01-17
  11. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2015-05-02

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