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Peer working time, labour supply, and happiness for male workers

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Listed:
  • Collewet M.M.F.
  • Grip A. de
  • Koning J.d.

    (ROA)

Abstract

This paper uncovers conspicuous work as a new form of status seeking that can explain social interactions in labour supply. We analyse how peer working time relates to both labour supply and happiness for Dutch male workers. Using a unique measure of peer weekly working time, we find that mens working time increases with that of their peers and that peer working time is negatively related to mens happiness. These findings are consistent with a conspicuous work model, in which individuals derive status from working time.

Suggested Citation

  • Collewet M.M.F. & Grip A. de & Koning J.d., 2015. "Peer working time, labour supply, and happiness for male workers," ROA Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2015006
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    File URL: https://cris.maastrichtuniversity.nl/portal/files/951902/content
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Externalities; General Welfare; Time Allocation and Labor Supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities

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