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Working Hours and Productivity

Listed author(s):
  • Collewet, Marion

    ()

    (CORE, Université catholique de Louvain)

  • Sauermann, Jan

    ()

    (SOFI, Stockholm University)

This paper studies the link between working hours and productivity using daily information on working hours and performance of a sample of call centre agents. We exploit variation in the number of hours worked by the same employee across days and weeks due to central scheduling, enabling us to estimate the effect of working hours on productivity. We find that as the number of hours worked increases, the average handling time for a call increases, meaning that agents become less productive. This result suggests that fatigue can play an important role, even in jobs with mostly part-time workers.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp10722.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 10722.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2017
Publication status: forthcoming in: Labour Economics, 2017
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10722
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  1. Xiangmin Liu & Rosemary Batt, 2007. "The Economic Pay-Offs to Informal Training: Evidence from Routine Service Work," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(1), pages 75-89, October.
  2. Boeri, Tito & Burda, Michael & Kramarz, Francis (ed.), 2008. "Working Hours and Job Sharing in the EU and USA: Are Europeans Lazy? Or Americans Crazy?," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199231027, April.
  3. Crocker, Thomas D & Horst, Robert L, Jr, 1981. "Hours of Work, Labor Productivity, and Environmental Conditions: A Case Study," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(3), pages 361-368, August.
  4. Bruno Crépon & Marie Leclair & Sébastien Roux, 2004. "RTT, productivité et emploi : nouvelles estimations sur données d'entreprises," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 376(1), pages 55-89.
  5. Thorsten Schank, 2005. "Are overtime plants more efficient than standard-time plants? A stochastic production frontier analysis using the IAB Establishment Panel," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 693-710, October.
  6. Hart, Robert A. & McGregor, Peter G., 1988. "The returns to labour services in West German manufacturing industry," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 947-963, April.
  7. Nyland,Chris, 1989. "Reduced Worktime and the Management of Production," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521345477, December.
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