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Recovery from Work and the Productivity of Working Hours

Author

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  • Pencavel, John

    () (Stanford University)

Abstract

Observations on munition workers are organized to examine the relationship between their output each week, their working hours and days each week, and their working hours and days in adjacent weeks. The hypothesis is that workers need to recover from work and a long working week results in greater fatigue and stress and yet provides insufficient time for recuperation before the next week's work opens. Workers require time off the job to restore their physical, mental, and emotional capacities and, if a long working week provides inadequate time to repair, their subsequent work performance suffers.

Suggested Citation

  • Pencavel, John, 2016. "Recovery from Work and the Productivity of Working Hours," IZA Discussion Papers 10103, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10103
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    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp10103.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nyland,Chris, 1989. "Reduced Worktime and the Management of Production," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521345477.
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    Cited by:

    1. Collewet, Marion & Sauermann, Jan, 2017. "Working hours and productivity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 96-106.
    2. Giorgio d'Agostino & Michele Raitano & Margherita Scarlato, 2019. "Job mobility and heterogeneous returns to apprenticeship training in Italy," Working Papers 0043, ASTRIL - Associazione Studi e Ricerche Interdisciplinari sul Lavoro.
    3. repec:eee:iepoli:v:42:y:2018:i:c:p:56-65 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Della Giusta, Marina & Jewell, Sarah, 2018. "Working for nothing: personality, time allocation and earnings in the UK," MPRA Paper 91481, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity; output; working hours; recovery;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • N34 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: 1913-

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