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How does Part-time Work Affect Firm Performance and Innovation Activity?

Author

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  • Rupietta, Kira

    () (University of Basel)

Abstract

This paper analyzes how part-time work affects financial and innovative firm performance. Moreover, it provides a detailed examination of part-time work by defining three different forms of part-time work (large, medium and small part-time work) depending on weekly working hours. Considering human capital theory, I expect part-time workers to have lower work experience and to accumulate less human capital. Thus I hypothesize that part-time work affects both, financial and innovative firm performance, negatively. For the empirical investigation I use a large German firm-level data set. The analysis shows that increasing part-time work has a significant negative impact on financial firm performance. Specifically, there are differences with regard to the considered categories of part-time work. Part-time workers having the fewest working hours per week have the strongest negative impact on financial firm performance. However the negative effect of part-time work does not remain for innovative firm performance. The results show no significant difference between part-time and full-time workers in their impact on innovative firm performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Rupietta, Kira, 2015. "How does Part-time Work Affect Firm Performance and Innovation Activity?," Working papers 2015/05, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2015/05
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:bla:jageco:v:68:y:2017:i:1:p:249-268 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    part-time work; financial firm performance; innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • M50 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - General

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