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Why Do Part-time Workers Invest Less in Human Capital than Full-timers?


  • Annemarie Nelen
  • Andries de Grip


We analyse whether lower investments in human capital of part-time workers are due to workers' characteristics or human resource practices of the firm. We focus on investments in both formal training and informal learning. Using the Dutch Life-Long-Learning Survey 2007, we find that part-time workers have different determinants for formal training and informal learning from full-time workers. The latter benefit from firms' human resource practices such as performance interviews, personal development plans, and feedback. Part-time workers can only partly compensate the lack of firm support when they have a high learning motivation and imagination of their future development. Copyright 2009 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Annemarie Nelen & Andries de Grip, 2009. "Why Do Part-time Workers Invest Less in Human Capital than Full-timers?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 61-83, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:23:y:2009:i:s1:p:61-83

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    2. Ichniowski, Casey & Shaw, Kathryn & Prennushi, Giovanna, 1997. "The Effects of Human Resource Management Practices on Productivity: A Study of Steel Finishing Lines," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 291-313, June.
    3. Stefano DellaVigna & M. Daniele Paserman, 2005. "Job Search and Impatience," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(3), pages 527-588, July.
    4. Lalith Munasinghe & Nachum Sicherman, 2000. "Why Do Dancers Smoke? Time Preference, Occupational Choice, and Wage Growth," NBER Working Papers 7542, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chloe Duvivier & Joseph Lanfranchi & Mathieu Narcy, 2015. "Les sources de l'écart de rémunération entre hommes et femmes au sein des trois versants de la fonction publique," Working Papers hal-01292147, HAL.
    2. Görlitz, Katja & Rzepka, Sylvi, 2014. "Does regional training supply determine employees' training participation?," Discussion Papers 2014/9, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    3. Kira Rupietta, 2015. "How does Part-time Work Affect Firm Performance and Innovation Activity?," Working papers 2015/05, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    4. Mathieu Narcy & Joseph Lanfranchi & Chloé Duvivier, 2016. "Les sources de l’écart de rémunération entre femmes et hommes dans la fonction publique," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 488(1), pages 123-150.
    5. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0831-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ferreira Sequeda M.T. & Grip A. de & Velden R.K.W. van der, 2015. "Does on-the-job informal learning in OECD countries differ by contract duration?," ROA Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    7. Devicienti, Francesco & Grinza, Elena & Vannoni, Davide, 2015. "The Impact of Part-Time Work on Firm Total Factor Productivity: Evidence from Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 9463, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Dongyeol Lee & Hyunjoon Lim, 2014. "Nonlinearity in Nexus between Working Hours and Productivity," Working Papers 2014-24, Economic Research Institute, Bank of Korea.
    9. Dieckhoff, Martina & Steiber, Nadia, 2009. "In search of gender differences in access to continuing training: Is there a gender training gap and if yes, why?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Skill Formation and Labor Markets SP I 2009-504, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    10. Ferreira Sequeda, Maria & de Grip, Andries & Van der Velden, Rolf, 2015. "Does Informal Learning at Work Differ between Temporary and Permanent Workers? Evidence from 20 OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 9322, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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