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Job Training, New Technology and Labour Turnover

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  • Christine Greenhalgh
  • George Mavrotas

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  • Christine Greenhalgh & George Mavrotas, 1996. "Job Training, New Technology and Labour Turnover," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 131-150, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:34:y:1996:i:1:p:131-150
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8543.1996.tb00474.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alex Bryson & Lorenzo Cappellari & Claudio Lucifora, 2004. "Does Union Membership Really Reduce Job Satisfaction?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, pages 439-459.
    2. Francis Green & Nicholas Tsitsianis, 2004. "Can the Changing Nature of Jobs Account for National Trends in Job Satisfaction?," Studies in Economics 0406, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    3. Andrew E. Clark, 2003. "Unemployment as a Social Norm: Psychological Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 289-322, April.
    4. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 135-141.
    5. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 223-242.
    6. Andrew Clark & Yannis Georgellis & Peter Sanfey, "undated". "Job Satisfaction, Wage changes and Quits: Evidence from Germany," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 98-06, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
    7. Green, Francis & McIntosh, Steven, 2001. "The intensification of work in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 291-308.
    8. Clark, Andrew E., 1997. "Job satisfaction and gender: Why are women so happy at work?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 341-372.
    9. Clark, Andrew E. & Senik, Claudia, 2006. "The (unexpected) structure of "rents" on the French and British labour markets," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 180-196, April.
    10. Francis Green, 2001. "It's Been A Hard Day's Night: The Concentration and Intensification of Work in Late Twentieth-Century Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, pages 53-80.
    11. Mitchel Y. Abolafia (ed.), 2005. "Markets," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2788.
    12. repec:lan:wpaper:3727 is not listed on IDEAS
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    14. repec:lan:wpaper:3621 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 135-141.
    16. Georgellis, Yannis & Sessions, John & Tsitsianis, Nikolaos, 2007. "Pecuniary and non-pecuniary aspects of self-employment survival," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, pages 94-112.
    17. A I Petrescu & R Simmons & S Bradley, 2004. "The impacts of human resource management practices and pay inequality on workers' job satisfaction," Working Papers 542602, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    18. Bauer, Thomas K., 2004. "High Performance Workplace Practices and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1265, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. Matthias Benz & Bruno S. Frey, 2008. "Being Independent is a Great Thing: Subjective Evaluations of Self-Employment and Hierarchy," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(298), pages 362-383, May.
    20. Andrew E. Clark, 1996. "Job Satisfaction in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, pages 189-217.
    21. E. Paul Durrenberger, 2005. "Labour," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Economic Anthropology, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    23. Francis Green, 2003. "The Rise and Decline of Job Insecurity," Studies in Economics 0305, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    24. John S. Heywood & W. S. Siebert & Xiangdong Wei, 2002. "Worker Sorting and Job Satisfaction: The Case of Union and Government Jobs," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, pages 595-609.
    25. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, pages 495-594.
    26. Joni Hersch & Joe A. Stone, 1990. "Is Union Job Dissatisfaction Real?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rolf van der Velden & Mark Levels & Jim Allen, 2014. "Educational mismatches and skills: New empirical tests of old hypotheses," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 34, pages 655-680 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    2. Jarle Moen, 2005. "Is Mobility of Technical Personnel a Source of R&D Spillovers?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(1), pages 81-114, January.
    3. Elizabeth Webster & Kelly Jarvis, 2003. "The Occupational Career Paths of Australian Tradesmen," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0320 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Peter Ilmolelian, 2005. "Do study grants help refugees find jobs? A case study of the effects of the voluntary sector grants on the education, training and employment of refugees in the United Kingdom," HEW 0501004, EconWPA.
    6. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:8:p:1519-1530 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Brunello, Giorgio & Gambarotto, Francesca, 2004. "Agglomeration Effects on Employer-Provided Training: Evidence from the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 1055, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. C Green & J S Heywood, 2007. "Does profit sharing increase training by reducing turnover?," Working Papers 589032, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    9. David G. Blanchflower & Lisa M. Lynch, 1994. "Training at Work: A Comparison of U.S. and British Youths," NBER Chapters,in: Training and the Private Sector: International Comparisons, pages 233-260 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Claudia Burgard, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 0320, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Patricia Simpson & Linda Stroh, 2002. "Revisiting Gender Variation in Training," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 21-53.
    12. Ilmolelian, Peter, 2005. "Do study grants help refugees find jobs? A case study of the effects of the voluntary sector grants on the education, training and employment of refugees in the United Kingdom," MPRA Paper 1416, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Verbruggen, M. & van Emmerik, H. & van Gils, A.E.J. & Meng, C.M. & de Grip, A., 2015. "Does early-career underemployment impact future career success? : a path dependency perspective," Research Memorandum 023, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).

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