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High-Performance Management Practices and Employee Outcomes in Denmark

  • Cristini, Annalise


    (Department of Economics, University of Bergamo)

  • Eriksson, Tor


    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

  • Pozzoli, Dario


    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

High-performance work practices are frequently considered to have positive e ects on corporate performance, but what do they do for employees? After showing that organizational innovation is indeed positively associated with rm performance, we investigate whether high-involvement work practices are associ- ated with higher wages, changes in wage inequality and workforce composition, using data from a survey directed at Danish private sector rms matched with linked employer-employee data. We also examine whether the relationship be- tween high-involvement work practices and employee outcomes is a ected by the industrial relations context

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Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 11-1.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 04 Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2011_001
Note: Original wp-no.: 01-11
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Phone: +45 89 486396
Fax: +45 8615 5175
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  7. John Godard, 2004. "A Critical Assessment of the High-Performance Paradigm," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 349-378, 06.
  8. Richard Blundell & Steve Bond, 1999. "GMM estimation with persistent panel data: an application to production functions," IFS Working Papers W99/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  9. Stephen Machin & Stephen Wood, 2005. "Human Resource Management as a Substitute for Trade Unions in British Workplaces," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(2), pages 201-218, January.
  10. Raghuram G. Rajan & Julie Wulf, 2006. "The Flattening Firm: Evidence from Panel Data on the Changing Nature of Corporate Hierarchies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 759-773, November.
  11. Sebastian Buhai & Elena Cottini & Niels Westerg�rd-Nielsen, 2008. "The Impact of Workplace Conditions on Firm Performance," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-077/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  12. Aghion, Philippe & Caroli, Eve & Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia, 1999. "Inequality and economic growth: the perspective of the new growth theories," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9908, CEPREMAP.
  13. Parrotta, Pierpaolo & Pozzoli, Daio, 2009. "The Effect of Learning by Hiring on Productivity," Working Papers 09-11, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  14. Ackerberg, Daniel & Caves, Kevin & Frazer, Garth, 2006. "Structural identification of production functions," MPRA Paper 38349, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2009. "On estimating firm-level production functions using proxy variables to control for unobservables," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 112-114, September.
  16. Nathalie Greenan & Jacques Mairesse, 1999. "Organizational Change in French Manufacturing: What Do We Learn From Firm Representatives and From Their Employees?," NBER Working Papers 7285, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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