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South–South Migration and Discrimination Against Women in Social Institutions: A Two-way Relationship

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  • Ferrant, Gaëlle
  • Tuccio, Michele

Abstract

Using the Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI) from the OECD Development Centre, this paper provides evidence on the two-way relationship between discrimination against women in social institutions and South–South migration. On the one hand, discriminatory social institutions in both origin and destination countries are an additional determinant of female migration. On the other hand, migration implies changes in discrimination against women according to the level of gender inequalities at destination. Specifically, migration toward countries with low levels of discrimination promotes gender equality in social institutions at home, while migration toward destinations with high levels of discrimination has the reverse effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Ferrant, Gaëlle & Tuccio, Michele, 2015. "South–South Migration and Discrimination Against Women in Social Institutions: A Two-way Relationship," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 240-254.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:72:y:2015:i:c:p:240-254
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.03.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ruyssen, Ilse & Salomone, Sara, 2018. "Female migration: A way out of discrimination?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 224-241.
    2. Nejad, Maryam Naghsh & Young, Andrew T., 2016. "Want freedom, will travel: Emigrant self-selection according to institutional quality," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 45(S), pages 71-84.
    3. Tuccio, Michele & Wahba, Jackline, 2015. "Can I Have Permission to Leave the House? Return Migration and the Transfer of Gender Norms," IZA Discussion Papers 9216, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Elisabetta Lodigiani & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Migration-induced Transfers of Norms. Political Empowerment?The case of Female Political Empowerment," Working Papers 2015:19, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    5. Maryam Naghsh Nejad & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "Female Brain Drains and Women's Rights Gaps : A Gravity Model Analysis of Bilateral Migration Flows," Working Papers 14-10, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    6. Chiara Falco, 2015. "Education and migration: empirical evidence from Ecuador," Working Papers 297, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2015.
    7. Komura, Mizuki & Ogawa, Hikaru, 2018. "Capital Market Integration and Gender Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 11885, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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