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Social Norms and Aspirations: Age of Marriage and Education in Rural India

  • Maertens, Annemie

Using a unique dataset that I collected in three villages in semi-arid India, I analyze the role of perceived returns to education and social norms regarding the ideal age of marriage in the educational plans, i.e., aspirations, parents have for their children. I show that perceptions of the ideal age of marriage significantly constrain the education that parents aspire to have for their daughters, but not their sons. Furthermore, aspirations are sensitive to the perceived returns to higher education in the case of boys, but not in the case of girls.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 47 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 1-15

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:47:y:2013:i:c:p:1-15
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  17. Erica Field & Attila Ambrus, 2008. "Early Marriage, Age of Menarche, and Female Schooling Attainment in Bangladesh," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(5), pages 881-930, October.
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