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Can parental migration reduce petty corruption in education?

Author

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  • Höckel, Lisa Sofie
  • Santos Silva, Manuel
  • Stöhr, Tobias

Abstract

Educational outcomes of children are highly dependent on household and school-level inputs. In poor countries, remittances from migrants can provide additional funds for the education of the left behind. At the same time the absence of migrant parents can affect families' time allocation towards education. Previous work on education inputs often implicitly assumed that preferences for different kinds of education inputs remain unchanged when household members migrate. Using survey data from Moldova, one of the countries with the highest emigration rates in the world, and an instrumental variable approach we find that the strongest migration-related response in private education expenditure are substantially lower informal payments to public school teachers. This fact is at odds with a positive income effect due to migration. We argue that our results are likely to be driven by changing preferences towards educational inputs induced by migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Höckel, Lisa Sofie & Santos Silva, Manuel & Stöhr, Tobias, 2015. "Can parental migration reduce petty corruption in education?," Kiel Working Papers 2018, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:kap:pubcho:v:171:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0442-z is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; emigration; education spending; social remittances; corruption; children left behind;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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