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International Migration and the Propagation of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Frédéric DOCQUIER

    ()

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) and FNRS)

  • Chrysovalantis VASILAKIS

    ()

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

  • D. TAMFUTU MUNSI

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

In this paper, we identify and quantify the role of international migration in the propagation of HIV across sub-Saharan African countries. We use a panel database on bilateral migration flows and HIV prevalence rates covering 44 countries over the nineties. Controlling for unobserved heterogeneity, spatial autocorrelation, reverse causality and reflection issues, and incorrect treatment of country fixed effects, we regress the log-change of HIV prevalence rates on the average levels of prevalence at destination and origin of migrants. We find evidence of a very robust emigration-induced propagation mechanism. On the contrary, immigration has no significant effect. Numerical experiments reveal that the long-run effect of emigration accounts for more than 5 percent of HIV prevalence rates in 18 countries (resp. 20 percent in 9 countries).

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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 2011038.

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Length: 20
Date of creation: 28 Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2011038
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  1. Frédéric DOCQUIER & Hillel RAPOPORT, 2011. "Globalization, brain drain and development," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2011009, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
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  4. Frédéric DOCQUIER & Chrysovalantis VASILAKIS & D. TAMFUTU MUNSI, 2014. "International Migration and the Propagation of HIV in Sub- Saharan Africa," Working Papers P89, FERDI.
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  8. Michel, BEINE & Frédéric, DOCQUIER & Maurice, SCHIFF, 2008. "International Migration, Transfers of Norms and Home Country Fertility," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2008043, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  9. Antoni Calv�-Armengol & Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2009. "Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(4), pages 1239-1267.
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