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Lessons from Uganda on strategies to fight poverty

Author

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  • Mackinnon, John
  • Reinikka, Ritva

Abstract

Countries receiving debt relief under the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries initiative will be among the first to benefit from the new World Bank -- International Monetary Fund approach to strengthening the impact on poverty of concessional assistance in low-income countries. The new approach features a more inclusive and participatory process for helping recipient countries develop poverty reduction strategies. From these strategies, joint Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) will bring together the country's own priorities and Bank-Fund assistance to the country. In Uganda, such a strategy has existed for several years. Uganda was one of the first low-income countries to prepare a comprehensive national strategy for poverty reduction using a participatory approach. Indeed, its experience contributed substantially to the design of the PRSPs. Uganda's top leadership is heavily committed to poverty reduction. Formulation of Uganda's Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP) in 1996-97 was the executive branch's effort to make that commitment and vision operational.The authors draw lessons from the drafting of Uganda's PEAP. First, the plan made extensive use of existing data and research about Uganda to refocus a range of public policies and interventions relevant to poverty reduction. Second, the government's approach was highly participatory, with central and local governments, the donor community, nongovernmental organizations and civil society, and academics invited to contribute. Third, the government was quick to translate the plan into its budget and medium-term spending framework. Public expenditures on basic services were significantly increased after adoption of the PEAP in 1997. The authors discuss the general characteristics of a poverty reduction action plan, drawing on Uganda's experience; discuss what is known about poverty in Uganda and identify shortcomings in the data; examine the macroeconomic and fiscal policies that were considered most important to poverty reduction during the participatory process; discuss the delivery of public services, especially those that directly affect the poor; and highlight problems associated with land issues, including problems with access to credit and financial services and with the security of productive assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Mackinnon, John & Reinikka, Ritva, 2000. "Lessons from Uganda on strategies to fight poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2440, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2440
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Mackinnon, 1995. "Health as an informational good: the determinants of child nutrition and mortality during political and economic recovery in Uganda," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1995-09, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. John Mackinnon, 1998. "Can robust pro-female policies be identified when the true model of the household is unknown?," CSAE Working Paper Series 1998-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
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    4. Ritva Reinikka & Paul Collier, 2001. "Uganda's Recovery : The Role of Farms, Firms, and Government," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13850, April.
    5. John Mackinnon, 1995. "Health as an information good: the determinants of child nutrition and mortality during political and economic recovery in Uganda," CSAE Working Paper Series 1995-09, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    6. Skinner, Jonathan, 1991. "Prospects for Agricultural Land Taxation in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 5(3), pages 493-511, September.
    7. Feder, Gershon & Noronha, Raymond, 1987. "Land Rights Systems and Agricultural Development in Sub-Saharan Afric a," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 2(2), pages 143-169, July.
    8. Simon Appleton & Arsene Balihuta, 1996. "Education and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Uganda," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 415-444.
    9. Reinikka, Ritva & Svensson, Jakob, 1999. "Confronting competition - investment response and constraints in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2242, The World Bank.
    10. Hoddinott, John, 1992. "Modelling Remittance Flows in Kenya," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 1(2), pages 206-232, August.
    11. Elbadawi, Ibrahim A, 1999. "External Aid: Help or Hindrance to Export Orientation in Africa?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(4), pages 578-616, December.
    12. Dreze, Jean & Stern, Nicholas, 1990. "Policy reform, shadow prices, and market prices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 1-45, June.
    13. John Mackinnon, 1998. "Can robust pro-female policies be identified when the true model of the household is unknown?," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1998-16, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    14. Appleton, Simon, 1996. "Women-headed households and household welfare: An empirical deconstruction for Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(12), pages 1811-1827, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Punam Chuhan-Pole & Manka Angwafo, 2011. "Yes Africa Can : Success Stories from a Dynamic Continent," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2335, April.
    2. Stefano Paternostro & Anand Rajaram & Erwin R. Tiongson, 2007. "How Does the Composition of Public Spending Matter?," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 47-82.
    3. Dabla-Norris, Era & Matoovu, John M. & Wade, Paul, 2002. "Debt Relief, Demand for Eduction, and Poverty," WIDER Working Paper Series 052, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Charles Augustine Abuka & Michael Atingi-Ego & Jacob Opolot & Marian Mraz, 2007. "The impact of OECD Agricultural trade liberalization on poverty in Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp208, IIIS.
    5. McKay, Andrew, 2002. "Assessing the Impact of Fiscal Policy on Poverty," WIDER Working Paper Series 043, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Charles Augustine Abuka & Michael Atingi-Ego & Jacob Opolot & Patrick Okello, 2007. "Determinants of poverty vulnerability in Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp203, IIIS.

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