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Determinants of poverty vulnerability in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Charles Augustine Abuka
  • Michael Atingi-Ego
  • Jacob Opolot
  • Patrick Okello

Abstract

Ugandan data shows poverty to be entrenched in rural areas and in large households. Households with heads exposed to education, an improved health status, less reliance on agriculture as the most important source of earnings, access to electricity for lighting and, the presence of markets to sell produce in the community experience improved household well-being. The data also confirms two known stylized facts regarding poverty vulnerability. First, households in the Northern region have a higher probability of being poor than those in Central, Eastern, and Western regions. Second, the ‘annual cropping and cattle northern' and ‘annual cropping and cattle Teso' zones are the agro ecological zones that are positively correlated with poverty vulnerability . The fact that residence in rural areas is associated with higher incidence of poverty suggests that promotion of off-farm employment (for example, through rural electrification) would help reduce vulnerability.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Augustine Abuka & Michael Atingi-Ego & Jacob Opolot & Patrick Okello, 2007. "Determinants of poverty vulnerability in Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp203, IIIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp203
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shenggen Fan & Xiaobo Zhang, 2008. "Public Expenditure, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Rural Uganda," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 20(3), pages 466-496.
    2. Nabbumba, Rosetti & Bahiigwa, Godfrey, 2003. "Agricultural Productivity Constraints in Uganda: Implications for Investment," Research Series 151127, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    3. N. S. Ssewanyana & A J. Okidi & D. Angemi & V. Barungi, 2004. "Understanding the determinants of income inequality in Uganda," CSAE Working Paper Series 2004-29, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    4. Charles Lwanga-Ntale & Kimberley McClean, 2004. "The Face of Chronic Poverty in Uganda from the Poor's Perspective: constraints and opportunities," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 177-194.
    5. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 1996. "How Important to India's Poor Is the Sectoral Composition of Economic Growth?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 1-25, January.
    6. Diego Angemi & N.S. Ssewanyana, 2004. "Understanding the Determinants of Income Inequality in Uganda," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2004-29, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Ritva Reinikka & Paul Collier, 2001. "Uganda's Recovery : The Role of Farms, Firms, and Government," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13850.
    8. Ellis, Frank & Bahiigwa, Godfrey, 2003. "Livelihoods and Rural Poverty Reduction in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 997-1013, June.
    9. David Lawson & Andy Mckay & John Okidi, 2006. "Poverty persistence and transitions in Uganda: A combined qualitative and quantitative analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(7), pages 1225-1251.
    10. Ssewanyana, Sarah & Nabyonga, Juliet O. & Kasirye, Ibrahim & Lawson, David, 2004. "Demand for Health Care Services in Uganda: Implications for Poverty Reduction," Research Series 150529, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    11. Bahiigwa, Godfrey, 2003. "Uganda's poverty eradication agenda: Measuring up to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)," Occasional Papers 93854, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    12. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Why Have Some Indian States Done Better Than Others at Reducing Rural Poverty?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(257), pages 17-38, February.
    13. Mackinnon, John & Reinikka, Ritva, 2000. "Lessons from Uganda on strategies to fight poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2440, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Majeed, Muhammad Tariq & Malik, Muhammad Nauman, 2014. "Determinants of Household Poverty: Empirical Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 57744, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Awan, Masood Sarwar & Malik, Nouman & Sarwar, Haroon & Waqas, Muhammad, 2011. "Impact of education on poverty reduction," MPRA Paper 31826, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Poverty vulnerability; logistic regression; Uganda;

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