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Escaping poverty and becoming poor in 36 villages of Central and Western Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Anirudh Krishna
  • Daniel Lumonya
  • Milissa Markiewicz
  • Firminus Mugumya
  • Agatha Kafuko
  • Jonah Wegoye

Abstract

Twenty-four per cent of households in 36 village communities of Central and Western Uganda have escaped from poverty over the past 25 years, but another 15 per cent have simultaneously fallen into poverty. A roughly equal number of households escaped from poverty in the first period (ten to 25 years ago) as in the second period (the last ten years) examined here. However, almost twice as many households fell into poverty during the second period as in the first period. Progress in poverty reduction has slowed down as a result. Multiple causes are associated with descent into poverty and these causes vary significantly between villages in the two different regions. For nearly two-thirds of all households in both regions, however, ill health and health-related costs were a principal reason for descent into poverty. Escaping poverty is also associated with diverse causes, which vary across the two regions. Compared to increases in urban employment, however, land-related reasons have been more important for escaping poverty in both regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Anirudh Krishna & Daniel Lumonya & Milissa Markiewicz & Firminus Mugumya & Agatha Kafuko & Jonah Wegoye, 2006. "Escaping poverty and becoming poor in 36 villages of Central and Western Uganda," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 346-370.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:42:y:2006:i:2:p:346-370
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380500405634
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. N. S. Ssewanyana & A J. Okidi & D. Angemi & V. Barungi, 2004. "Understanding the determinants of income inequality in Uganda," CSAE Working Paper Series 2004-29, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hanjra, Munir A. & Ferede, Tadele & Gutta, Debel Gemechu, 2009. "Reducing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa through investments in water and other priorities," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(7), pages 1062-1070, July.
    2. Jean-Marie Baland & Frederic Gaspart & Jean-Philippe Platteau & Frank Place, 2007. "The Distributive Impact of Land Markets in Uganda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 283-311.
    3. Martin Ravallion, 2014. "Can We Trust Shoestring Evaluations?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 28(3), pages 413-431.
    4. Harris, David & Orr, Alastair, 2014. "Is rainfed agriculture really a pathway from poverty?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 84-96.
    5. Dekker, Marleen & Wilms, Annegien, 2010. "Health Insurance and Other Risk-Coping Strategies in Uganda: The Case of Microcare Insurance Ltd," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 369-378, March.
    6. Radeny, Maren & van den Berg, Marrit & Schipper, Rob, 2012. "Rural Poverty Dynamics in Kenya: Structural Declines and Stochastic Escapes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1577-1593.
    7. Van Campenhout, Bjorn, 2015. "The dynamics of smallholder marketing behavior: Explorations using Ugandan and Mozambican panel data:," IFPRI discussion papers 1478, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Sophie King, 2014. "Cultivating political capabilities among Ugandan smallholders: good governance or popular organisation building?," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 19314, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    9. Ana María Ibañez & Andrés Moya, 2010. "Do Conflicts Create Poverty Traps? Asset Losses and Recovery for Displaced Households in Colombia," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America, pages 137-172 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Shaffer, Paul, 2013. "Ten Years of “Q-Squared”: Implications for Understanding and Explaining Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 269-285.
    11. Hickey, Sam, 2013. "Beyond the Poverty Agenda? Insights from the New Politics of Development in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 194-206.
    12. Krishna, Anirudh, 2007. "For Reducing Poverty Faster: Target Reasons Before People," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1947-1960, November.
    13. Carlo Azzarri & Elizabeth Cross, 2016. "Improved Spatially Disaggregated Livestock Measures for Uganda," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 46(1), pages 37-73, Winter.
    14. Patti Kristjanson & Nelson Mango & Anirudh Krishna & Maren Radeny & Nancy Johnson, 2010. "Understanding poverty dynamics in Kenya," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(7), pages 978-996.
    15. Solava Ibrahim, 2011. "Poverty, aspirations and wellbeing: afraid to aspire and unable to reach a better life – voices from Egypt," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 14111, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    16. Bjorn Van Campenhout & Haruna Sekabira & Fiona Nattembo, 2015. "Uganda - A new set of utility consistent poverty line," WIDER Working Paper Series 129, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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