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Poverty Persistence and Transitions in Uganda: A Combined Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

  • David Lawson

Despite Uganda`s impressive reduction in monetary based poverty, during the 1990`s, recent evidence has shown there to be substantial mobility into and out of poverty. This paper represents on the first attempts to combine both qualitative and quantitative information to understand the factors underlying such poverty transitions and persistence. Using national participatory assessments and panel data we find a number of factors, such as lack of key physical assets, high dependency ratios and increased household size are identified by both qualitative and quantitative approaches as being major drivers of poverty dynamics. The paper also demonstrates that there is considerable value added in combining the two approaches allowing us to provide a much richer understanding of many of the processes underlying poverty and poverty transitions.

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File URL: http://www.gprg.org/pubs/workingpapers/pdfs/gprg-wps-004.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number GPRG-WPS-004.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2005
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:gprg-wps-004
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  1. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  2. Okrasa, Wlodzimierz, 1999. "Who avoids and who escapes from poverty during transition? - evidence from Polish panel data, 1993-96," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2218, The World Bank.
  3. Alderman, Harold & Watkins, Susan Cotts & Kohler, Hans-Peter & Maluccio, John A. & Behrman, Jere R., 2000. "Attrition in longitudinal household survey data," FCND discussion papers 96, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Benjamin Davis & Marco Stampini, 2002. "Pathways Towards Prosperity in Rural Nicaragua: Why households drop in and out of poverty, and some policy suggestions on how to keep them out," Working Papers 02-12, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  5. Ravallion, Martin, 1996. "Issues in Measuring and Modelling Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1328-43, September.
  6. Mckay, Andrew & Lawson, David, 2003. "Assessing the Extent and Nature of Chronic Poverty in Low Income Countries: Issues and Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 425-439, March.
  7. Fields, Gary S. & Cichello, Paul & Freije, Samuel & Menéndez, Marta & Newhouse, David, 2003. "Household income dynamics : a four-country story," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/1562, Paris Dauphine University.
  8. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966, March.
  9. Gaiha, Raghav & Deolalikar, Anil B, 1993. "Persistent, Expected and Innate Poverty: Estimates for Semi-arid Rural South India, 1975-1984," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 409-21, December.
  10. Sen, Binayak, 2003. "Drivers of Escape and Descent: Changing Household Fortunes in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 513-534, March.
  11. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Is transient poverty different? Evidence for rural China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 82-99.
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