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The Impact of Population Growth on Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Stephan Klasen

    () (University of Goettingen)

  • David Lawson

    (University of Manchester)

Abstract

The paper examines the link between population and per capita economic growth, and poverty, using the interesting case study of Uganda. Although Uganda has recently experienced excellent economic growth and poverty reduction, it currently has one of the highest population growth rates in the world which, due to the inherent demographic momentum, will persist for some time to come. By combining both a macro and microeconometric approach, using panel data, we are able to consider the impact of population growth on per capita economic growth and poverty. We find both theoretical considerations and strong empirical evidence suggest that the currently high population growth puts a considerable break on per capita growth prospects in Uganda. Moreover, it contributes significantly to low achievement in poverty reduction and is associated with households being persistently poor and moving into poverty. This is therefore likely to make substantial improvements in poverty reduction, and per capita growth, very difficult.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan Klasen & David Lawson, 2007. "The Impact of Population Growth on Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Uganda," Departmental Discussion Papers 133, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics, revised 25 May 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:got:vwldps:133
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    File URL: http://www2.vwl.wiso.uni-goettingen.de/departmentpaper/NO_133.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pritchett, Lant H. & DEC, 1994. "Desired fertility and the impact of population policies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1273, The World Bank.
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    6. Diego Angemi & N.S. Ssewanyana, 2004. "Understanding the Determinants of Income Inequality in Uganda," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2004-29, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Neil McCulloch & Bob Baulch, 2000. "Simulating the impact of policy upon chronic and transitory poverty in rural Pakistan," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 100-130.
    8. John Luke Gallup & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew D. Mellinger, 1998. "Geography and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 6849, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. David Lawson & Andy Mckay & John Okidi, 2006. "Poverty persistence and transitions in Uganda: A combined qualitative and quantitative analysis," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(7), pages 1225-1251.
    10. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke, 2003. "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1091-1113, September.
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    12. Stephan Klasen & Claudia Wink, 2003. ""Missing Women": Revisiting The Debate," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2-3), pages 263-299.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Anyanwu, 2013. "Working Paper 181 - Determining the Correlates of Poverty for Inclusive Growth in Africa," Working Paper Series 979, African Development Bank.
    2. Fumitaka Furuoka, 2009. "Population Growth and Economic Development: New Empirical Evidence from Thailand," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(1), pages 1-14.
    3. Onipede Wusu & Emmanuel O. Amoo, 2016. "Fertility Behaviour and Wealth Situation in Nigeria: Evidence from 2013 Demographic and Health Survey," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 1-14, August.
    4. Renate Ohr, 2009. "European Monetary Union at Ten: Had the German Maastricht Critics Been Wrong?," Departmental Discussion Papers 141, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Corinna Ahlfeld, 2009. "The scapegoat of heterogeneity - How fragmentation influences political decisionmaking," Departmental Discussion Papers 143, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    6. Furuoka, Fumitaka, 2014. "Population and economic development in Sarawak, Malaysia," MPRA Paper 60636, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Fumitaka Furuoka & Qaiser Munir, 2011. "Population growth and standard of living: A threshold regression approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 844-859.
    8. van Waeyenberge, Elisa. & Bargawi, Hannah., 2011. "Macroeconomic policy for "full and productive employment and decent work for all" : Uganda country study," ILO Working Papers 994658733402676, International Labour Organization.
    9. Rana Nabeel Ahmed & Kahlil Ahmad, 2016. "Impact of Population on Economic Growth: A Case Study of Pakistan," Bulletin of Business and Economics (BBE), Research Foundation for Humanity (RFH), vol. 5(3), pages 162-176, September.
    10. repec:ilo:ilowps:465873 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population; poverty; Uganda; household size;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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