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Income-Distribution Dynamics with Endogenous Fertility

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  • Daniel Chen
  • Michael Kremer

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Chen & Michael Kremer, 1999. "Income-Distribution Dynamics with Endogenous Fertility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 155-160, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:89:y:1999:i:2:p:155-160
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.89.2.155
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.89.2.155
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Deininger, K & Squire, L, 1996. "Measuring Income Inequality : A New Data-Base," Papers 537, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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