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Do new delivery systems improve extension access? Evidence from rural Uganda

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  • Faye, Issa
  • Deininger, Klaus W.

Abstract

The literature has long identified lack of rural diversification and low intensity of input use as two key constraints to sustainable and pro-poor growth in Uganda. We use data from a large nationally representative survey to demonstrate that broader access to agricultural extension could increase diversification and input use and that a surprisingly high level of farmers (more than are actually reached) would be willing to pay for such services. Although willingness to pay increases with wealth, illustrative simulations suggest that, due to knowledge spillovers, policies to respond more effectively to the demand for extension services would also benefit the poor.

Suggested Citation

  • Faye, Issa & Deininger, Klaus W., 2005. "Do new delivery systems improve extension access? Evidence from rural Uganda," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19405, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea05:19405
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/19405
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Muatha, Irene Teresia & Otieno, David Jakinda & Nyikal, Rose Adhiambo, 2016. "Factors influencing smallholder farmers’ awareness of agricultural extension devolution in Kenya: a binary logit analysis," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246283, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

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