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Demand for health care services in Uganda: Implications for poverty reduction


  • Kasirye, Ibrahim
  • Ssewanyana, Sarah
  • Nabyonga, Juliet
  • Lawson, David


Using the 2002/03 Uganda National Household Survey data we empirically examine the nature and determinants of individuals’ decisions to seek care on condition of illness reporting. The major findings include: first, cost of care is regressive and substantially reduces the health care utilization for any formal provider by the poorer individuals after controlling for other factors. In other words, even among public facilities cost of care remains a barrier to utilization of these services. Second, there is no doubt that putting in place strategies aimed at increasing the income of the poor will increase their utilization of the health facilities, though the impact will be higher for private care. Third, besides income and cost of care, other factors, in particular education and physical access proxied by distance to the facilities are important determinants of health care utilization.

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  • Kasirye, Ibrahim & Ssewanyana, Sarah & Nabyonga, Juliet & Lawson, David, 2004. "Demand for health care services in Uganda: Implications for poverty reduction," MPRA Paper 8558, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:8558

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Randall P. Elllis & D. Keith McInnes & Elizabeth H. Stephenson, 1994. "Inpatient and outpatient Health Care Demand in Cairo, Egypt," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 38, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
    3. Ritva Reinikka & Paul Collier, 2001. "Uganda's Recovery : The Role of Farms, Firms, and Government," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13850, March.
    4. John S. Akin & David K. Guilkey & Paul L. Hutchinson & Michael T. Mcintosh, 1998. "Price elasticities of demand for curative health care with control for sample selectivity on endogenous illness: an analysis for Sri Lanka," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(6), pages 509-531.
    5. Germano Mwabu & Martha Ainsworth & Andrew Nyamete, 1993. "Quality of Medical Care and Choice of Medical Treatment in Kenya: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 838-862.
    6. Okello, D. O. & Lubanga, R. & Guwatudde, D. & Sebina-Zziwa, A., 1998. "The challenge to restoring basic health care in Uganda," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 13-21, January.
    7. David E. Sahn & Stephen D. Younger & Garance Genicot, 2003. "The Demand for Health Care Services in Rural Tanzania," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(2), pages 241-260, May.
    8. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521747387, May.
    9. Mbugua, J. Karanja & Bloom, Gerald H. & Segall, Malcolm M., 1995. "Impact of user charges on vulnerable groups: The case of Kibwezi in rural Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 829-835, September.
    10. Akin, John S. & Guilkey, David K. & Hazel?Denton, E., 1995. "Quality of services and demand for health care in Nigeria: A multinomial probit estimation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 1527-1537, June.
    11. Akin, John S, et al, 1986. "The Demand for Primary Health Care Services in the Bicol Region of the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(4), pages 755-782, July.
    12. Martine AUDIBERT & Jacky MATHONNAT, 1998. "Cost Recovery in Mauritania: Initial Lessons from Reform," Working Papers 199811, CERDI.
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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2004. "The Republic of Uganda : Country Integrated Fiduciary Assessment 2004, Volume 1. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15681, The World Bank.
    2. Seewanyana, Sarah & Kasirye, Ibrahim, 2010. "Gender differences in Uganda: the case for access to education and health services," Research Series 113612, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    3. Conrad Y. Puozaa, 2016. "The Determinants of Hospital Length of Stay in Nigeria," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 9(3), pages 34-42, December.
    4. Mawuli Gaddah & Alistair Munro, 2011. "The Progressivity Of Health Care Services In Ghana," GRIPS Discussion Papers 11-14, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    5. World Bank, 2004. "The Republic of Uganda : Country Integrated Fiduciary Assessment 2004, Volume 2. Public Expenditure Review 2004 - Promoting the Efficient Use of Public Resources for Poverty Eradication," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14511, The World Bank.
    6. Riman, Hodo B. & Akpan, Emmanuel S., 2012. "Healthcare Financing and Health outcomes in Nigeria: A State Level Study using Multivariate Analysis," MPRA Paper 55215, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Charles Augustine Abuka & Michael Atingi-Ego & Jacob Opolot & Patrick Okello, 2007. "Determinants of poverty vulnerability in Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp203, IIIS.

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    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health


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