IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/eprcrs/113612.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender differences in Uganda: the case for access to education and health services

Author

Listed:
  • Seewanyana, Sarah
  • Kasirye, Ibrahim

Abstract

Using the nationally representative Gender Productivity Survey (GPS) of 2007/08 conducted by the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBoS), the paper examines gender biases in school attainment, returns to education, expenditure on health and education, access to health services. While Uganda has recorded progress on MDG 3: promote gender equality and empower women, the paper reveals that significant gender biases still exist with a regional dimension. These biases are more pronounced in Northern Uganda, which is the poorest region. In other words, interventions in this part of the country should be able to address these biases if the region is to catch up with the rest of the country. These findings further suggest that free education both at primary and secondary level; and abolition of user fees in public health facilities is not sufficient for elimination of gender bias. Policies should be based on a better understanding of the household’s decision making process.

Suggested Citation

  • Seewanyana, Sarah & Kasirye, Ibrahim, 2010. "Gender differences in Uganda: the case for access to education and health services," Research Series 113612, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eprcrs:113612
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/113612
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Esther Duflo & Christopher Udry, 2003. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in Côte D'ivoire: Social Norms, Separate Accounts and Consumption Choices," Working Papers 857, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    2. de Walque, Damien, 2007. "How does the impact of an HIV/AIDS information campaign vary with educational attainment? Evidence from rural Uganda," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 686-714, November.
    3. Kingdon, Geeta Gandhi, 2005. "Where Has All the Bias Gone? Detecting Gender Bias in the Intrahousehold Allocation of Educational Expenditure," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(2), pages 409-451, January.
    4. Ssewanyana, Sarah & Nabyonga, Juliet O. & Kasirye, Ibrahim & Lawson, David, 2004. "Demand for Health Care Services in Uganda: Implications for Poverty Reduction," Research Series 150529, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    5. Andrew Leigh, 2008. "Returns To Education In Australia," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 27(3), pages 233-249, September.
    6. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    7. Agnes R. Quisumbing & John A. Maluccio, 2003. "Resources at Marriage and Intrahousehold Allocation: Evidence from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Indonesia, and South Africa," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(3), pages 283-327, July.
    8. Alderman, Harold & King, Elizabeth M., 1998. "Gender differences in parental investment in education," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 453-468, December.
    9. Monazza Aslam & Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 2008. "Gender and household education expenditure in Pakistan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(20), pages 2573-2591.
    10. Pagan, Jose A & Sanchez, Susana M, 2000. "Gender Differences in Labor Market Decisions: Evidence from Rural Mexico," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(3), pages 619-637, April.
    11. Song, Lina & Appleton, Simon & Knight, John, 2006. "Why Do Girls in Rural China Have Lower School Enrollment?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1639-1653, September.
    12. Gunderson, Morley, 1989. "Male-Female Wage Differentials and Policy Responses," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 46-72, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Buyinza, Faisal, 2011. "Performance and Survival of Ugandan Manufacturing firms in the context of the East African Community," Research Series 150477, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
    2. Sarah, Ssewanyana & Geofrey, Okoboi & Ibrahim, Kasirye, 2011. "Cost Benefit Analysis of the Uganda Post Primary Education and Training Expansion and Improvement (PPETEI) Project," Research Series 150242, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eprcrs:113612. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eprccug.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.